Inflammation Treatment: 3 Ways to Calm Your Immune System

Learn how medication, nutrition, and stress reduction work together as inflammation treatment to heal your body inside and out.

inflammation treatment

Acute inflammation symptoms are quite noticeable. They can cause pain, swelling, redness, loss of function in the affected region, and skin that is warm to the touch.

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As medical experts learn more about inflammation and how it affects our overall health, its link to a broad array of diseases and medical conditions has also been discovered. Its effect on almost all parts of the body—heart, lungs, bones, joints, skin, brain, and more—means that doctors often recommend a multi-faceted approach to inflammation treatment.

Inflammation is often discussed in negative terms, but it’s your immune system’s way of building a defense against bacteria or viruses or of helping to heal and protect an injured portion of the body by increasing blood flow to the area. This response helps to keep us safe from trauma. But when inflammation becomes chronic and systemic, it could have a negative effect on your health.

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Causes and Types of Inflammation

Inflammation can be caused by various triggers, such infection, physical injury, or an overactive immune system. The triggers cause the body’s arteries to enlarge and supply an increased flow of blood to the damaged region, fluid and proteins to build up, and the body to release a type of white blood cell called a neutrophil. Once these three processes occur, inflammation symptoms become noticeable.

There are two types of inflammation: acute and chronic. Acute inflammation symptoms progress quickly, can become severe in a short period of time, and can often be relieved within a few days or weeks with treatment. Conditions that can cause acute inflammation include:

Chronic inflammation can last several months or years. In some cases, it results from acute inflammation that went untreated; in others cases, it occurs because of an autoimmune disorder. Conditions that can cause chronic inflammation include:

Chronic inflammation also has been found to be the common denominator in many age-related diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, dementia, and osteoporosis.

Inflammation Symptoms and Tests

Acute inflammation symptoms are quite noticeable. They can cause pain, swelling, redness, loss of function in the affected region, and skin that is warm to the touch.

Chronic inflammation, however, can often go unnoticed or be mistaken for other conditions. Symptoms can include:

Testing for Inflammation

There are several blood tests that doctors use to diagnose both acute and chronic inflammation. The most common test is high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), which detects a protein that the body makes in response to inflammation. This test is ideal for detecting low-grade, chronic, and body-wide inflammation, and can effectively predict your chance of having a heart attack or stroke.

(For more information about high sensitivity C-reactive protein, check out Do You Have Inflammation or Diabetes? 2 Tests Give the Answer.)

Other tests doctors use to assess inflammation in the body include fasting insulin, hemoglobin A1c, serum ferritin, and red blood cell width, according to David Jockers, DNM, DC, MS.

3 Common Inflammation Treatments

Depending on the type and severity of inflammation found within the body, your doctor may recommend one or all the following inflammation treatments to heal or manage the condition that’s causing it.

#1. MEDICATION

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are often used to reduce inflammation associated with arthritis, muscle pain, and headaches. Ibuprofen, naproxen, and celecoxib are among the most common NSAIDs recommended by doctors.
  • A group of steroid hormones that includes cortisol, corticosteroids are divided into two smaller groups: glucocorticoids, which are used to treat arthritis, lupus, IBS, and asthma, and mineralocorticoids, which are used to treat cerebral salt wasting and Addison’s disease.
  • Antibiotics and anti-viral medications. If testing reveals that a bacterial infection is the cause of your inflammation, your doctor may recommend antibiotics. These drugs, such as penicillin, are sometimes used to treat sinusitis, periodontitis, meningitis, and peptic ulcers. If inflammation is present due to a viral infection, your doctor may prescribe anti-viral medications for conditions such as the flu and hepatitis. These drugs can’t kill viruses but can inhibit their development.

#2. NUTRITION

What you put into your body can either heal or feed your chronic inflammation. Your diet should be high in vitamin K, antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids, which can help lower inflammation. This means you should be eating plenty of fruits, leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish. Avoid eating large amounts of fatty meat, fried foods, and trans fats, which can have the opposite effect.

(For more information about eating an anti-inflammatory diet, check out “Anti-Inflammatory Diet: It Could Be Your Key to Pain Prevention.”)

Plus, certain herbs and spices are recognized by medical experts as inflammation treatments and can be added to food and beverages or taken as supplements. Among them:

#3. STRESS REDUCTION

Many experts believe that the key to preventing inflammation is to keep stress levels low with regular exercise, a healthy sleep regimen, and stress reduction techniques.

Stress reduction is a beneficial inflammation treatment for those suffering from low grade variety, which can cause chronic fatigue, obesity, and other serious conditions. Studies show multiple links between stress, fatigue, and inflammation.

In one study, researchers reported that stress can inhibit the body’s ability to use the hormone cortisol to manage inflammation (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, April 2, 2012). “Inflammation is partly regulated by the hormone cortisol, and when cortisol is not allowed to serve this function, inflammation can get out of control,” study author Sheldon Cohen, PhD, of Carnegie Mellon University, said in a statement.

Tell your doctor if you feel chronically anxious, and make it a point to work managing the stress in your life. Consider stress-relieving techniques such as mindfulness or meditation, or simply find a hobby you enjoy that can take your mind off of your worries.

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Comments
  • Melvin H.

    Please do not confuse the noun “effect” with “affect”.

  • Carol J.

    I have Celiacs Disease and all though I consider myself to be very conscientious about what I eat, I still deal with fatigue, brain fog, etc. I’m due for a blood test, and will ask for the C-Reative Protein Test to be included.Thanks!

  • Some of this information seems quite related to the medical treatment that is offered in Ayuredic medical treatment. Since I have been following much of the advice from that source and study I have had great improvements in body mass, intestinal symptoms , general aches, and energy. I am a retired nurse. Seems there could be more connection with current medical study and care

  • Any help for gout excruciating pain. Swelling, swollen red joints . Feet, knees , and wrist.
    Treating me only with steroid, and colchicine. Not working.

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