Bones & Joints

Bones & Joints

Bones and joints become vulnerable to wear and tear as we age. Treatments range from pain relievers and physical therapy to joint replacement.

More than 52 million adults, many of them over 65, live with arthritis. About half of them are limited in their activities. Arthritis is a degenerative condition in which the joints—the cushioning surfaces between bones—wear away. Typical arthritis symptoms include pain, stiffness, swelling, and reduced range of motion.

Arthritis comes in many forms, including degenerative osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (an autoimmune disease), and psoriatic arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis, not only do the joints swell up, but red, scaly patches called plaques also form on the skin. Gout is another type of arthritis that’s caused by a buildup of uric acid in the blood. The excess uric acid forms into crystals that congregate in the joints—most often in the big toe—causing pain and swelling. A number of medications are available to treat arthritis pain and inflammation.

With time, bones become weaker, more brittle, and could fracture. The early stage of bone loss is called osteopenia, and it affects about half of Americans over age 50. Doctors can determine the amount of bone loss with a bone mineral density (BMD) test. Results are expressed as a T-score, which is based on a comparison with the bones of a healthy 30-year old. People with normal bone density have a T-score that is within 1 standard deviation (SD) of a 30-year old’s score. A score 1 to 2.5 SD below a young adult’s (-1 to -2.5 SD) is considered low bone mass, or osteopenia. Osteoporosis is diagnosed in anyone with a score of -2.5 SD or lower. People with osteoporosis need to take medicines such as bisphosphonates to strengthen their bones and prevent fractures.

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arthritis

Arthritis: Making the Diagnosis

· · Bones & Joints
Once your medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests have been evaluated, your medical provider may diagnose you with one of the following types of arthritis. It also is possible that you may be diagnosed with a multisystem disorder.

Degenerative Arthritis

OA is the main cause of degenerative arthritis. It can affect … Read More
Can osteoporosis be reversed

Can Osteoporosis Be Reversed Without Drugs?

· · Bones & Joints
Many women and men diagnosed with osteoporosis are immediately prescribed prescription drugs which, they discover sooner or later, can have difficult-to-tolerate side effects as well as frightening long-term risks. Can osteoporosis be reversed? This realization leads many individuals with osteoporosis to ask, "Can osteoporosis be reversed … Read More
arthritis

8 Dietary Supplements for Arthritis

· · Bones & Joints

Alternative treatment options can be a good adjunct to medication when it comes to managing arthritis symptoms. Some of the options address physical causes of pain, but don’t forget that chronic pain is complicated.

In arthritis, tissue inflammation, bone erosion, and nerve impingement can combine to “rewire” your nervous system, making … Read More

arthritis symptoms

Managing Arthritis Symptoms: 3 Alternative Options

· · Bones & Joints
Alternative treatment options can be a good adjunct to medication when it comes to managing arthritis symptoms. Some of the options address physical causes of pain, but don’t forget that chronic pain is complicated. In arthritis, tissue inflammation, bone erosion, and nerve impingement can combine to “rewire” your nervous system, … Read More
sarcopenia

How Sarcopenia Can Threaten Your Mobility

· · Bones & Joints

Threats to a person’s mobility and independence come in various forms. Some are obvious while others develop gradually and have a cumulative effect, such as sarcopenia.

For many older adults, inactivity is a process that develops over decades. The older some people get, the less active they become. It’s not because … Read More

causes of arthritis

The Four Causes of Arthritis

· · Bones & Joints

Arthritis refers to joint inflammation, but the term also is more loosely used to describe any disorder that affects the joints. It is a symptom, rather than a specific disease. Arthritic conditions fall into a wider disease category known as “rheumatic diseases.” There are more than 100 types, each with … Read More


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