Pain

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For more than 100 million Americans, conditions like arthritis, fibromyalgia, nerve damage, migraine headaches, or cancer can cause unrelenting pain. But relief is now available in new classes of drugs, yoga exercises, and inflammation-reducing diets.

Take migraine headaches, for instance, a common source of chronic pain affecting 1 in 10 Americans, most of them women. These are not just everyday headaches. Migraine symptoms also include nausea, vomiting, light and sound sensitivity, auras, and other visual disturbances. Because doctors still don’t fully understand what causes migraines, they haven’t been able to develop a cure for this condition. Treatments aim to reduce the frequency of migraine attacks and relieve symptoms when they start.

Fibromyalgia is another poorly understood condition. The estimated 5 million Americans who have this condition experience fatigue and pain in particular spots around their body. Other fibromyalgia symptoms include sleep problems, headaches, sensitivity to heat and cold, bowel issues, and memory problems.

Back problems are another source of chronic pain. Sciatica affects the lower back and legs. It starts in the sciatic nerve, which runs down the lower back, hips, buttocks, and legs. A herniated disk that puts pressure on the sciatic nerve often triggers sciatica. Spinal stenosis—a narrowing of the spine—can also put pressure on the sciatic nerve. Sciatica can be very painful, but medicines, physical therapy, and other treatments usually improve the pain within a few weeks.

Sometimes back pain can be traced to the kidneys, which are located on the back side of the body. Many people mistake kidney pain for back muscle strains. The most common causes of kidney pain are infection, kidney stones, polycystic kidney disease (in which growths called cysts form in the kidneys), bleeding, and kidney cancer. Because kidney pain can signal a more serious condition, it’s important to call the doctor for any constant, dull pain on one side of the back.

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Lockjaw Versus a Locked Jaw: What’s the Difference

· · Pain
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back spasms

What to Do for a Back Spasm

· · Pain
Almost everyone gets back pain at some point. People may say they have a backache or back spasm, or that they threw their back out. These are all descriptions of acute low back pain, back pain that starts suddenly. A muscle spasm is another word for a muscle cramp. It … Read More
picking scabs

Picking Scabs: Why We Do It and How to Stop

· · Pain
Ever enjoyed popping a pimple? How about poking a blister? It can feel gratifying to watch the grossness ooze out, right? Many people are guilty of picking scabs and some people even eat them afterwards. In fact, our desire to pick our scabs could say something important about our mental … Read More
middle back pain

Middle Back Pain Causes

· · Pain
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throwing your back out

“Threw Out My Back!” What Can You Do About It?

· · Pain
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Woman holding her hands with a doctor to talk about her pain symptoms

Vitamin B12 May Help Treat Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis

· · Pain
Those who suffer with inflamed nerve cells in neurological disorders such as fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, MS, and neuropathy know the burning, the numbness, and the pain that comes with these conditions. Fortunately, exciting research is showing that the symptoms associated with many neurological disorders can be greatly reduced with therapeutic … Read More

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