cancer

More than half a million people die from cancer annually?but targeted therapies and other treatments offer hope to countless more.

Cancer starts when genetic changes cause cells to divide out of control and form tumors, which can then spread to other parts of the body. The disease can affect any organ. Ovarian cancer is the most deadly reproductive cancer in women. Often, it?s caught at a late stage because no screening tests exist. Ovarian cancer symptoms include abdominal bloating, pain in the abdomen or pelvis, and a rapid feeling of fullness while eating.

Skin cancers, such as melanoma and basal cell carcinoma, are on the rise and are fueled by sun exposure. Basal cell carcinoma is by far the most common type of skin cancer, with 3.5 million new cases diagnosed each year.

Leukemia is a cancer of the blood. Depending on the type of leukemia, it can affect white blood cells of the immune system, red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body, or platelets that clot the blood. Leukemia symptoms vary depending on the type of the disease, but can include fatigue, fever, chills, easy bleeding or bruising, and swollen lymph nodes.

Colon cancer primarily affects people over age 50. This type of cancer starts in the lower part of the intestine (colon). It forms growths called polyps, which can be identified on a screening colonoscopy. Colon cancer symptoms include blood in the stool, stomach cramps, diarrhea or constipation, and unintended weight loss.

Although lung cancer is not the most common cancer, it?s the leading cause of cancer-related death. Smoking is the biggest risk factor for lung cancer. Exposure to chemicals such as asbestos accounts for a smaller number of cases. Lung cancer symptoms include a cough, chest pain, and shortness of breath.

Impacted Bowel: Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

An impacted bowel is one of the more unpleasant digestive issues you can experience. Bowel obstruction symptoms occur when a mass of dry, hard stool will not pass out of the colon or rectum. Bowel impaction can become a serious issue if not treated, and in extreme cases may even … Read More

Are Potato Chips Bad for You?

Salt and vinegar, barbecue, kettle-cooked, ruffled — to me, all potato chips are delicious. If there's a bag on the counter, I’ll polish it off easily. Are potato chips bad for you? I know the answer, so I’ve tried to replace my chip craving with healthy options like carrot sticks … Read More

PSA: What’s Normal?

PSA is prostate specific antigen, a protein made by prostate cells that shows up in your blood with a PSA blood test. PSA levels increase with prostate cancer, so PSA has been used as a screening test for prostate cancer for many years. A cancer screening test is a test … Read More

Picking Scabs: Why We Do It and How to Stop

Ever enjoyed popping a pimple? How about poking a blister? It can feel gratifying to watch the grossness ooze out, right? Many people are guilty of picking scabs and some people even eat them afterwards. In fact, our desire to pick our scabs could say something important about our mental … Read More

Are You at Risk for Calcium Deficiency?

You probably know that calcium is important for growing and keeping your bones strong. Did you know that calcium has many other important functions? These include heart, muscle, nerve, blood vessel, and hormone functions. There is also some evidence that maintaining a normal calcium level may reduce your risk for … Read More

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