Is Tupperware BPA-Free? What You Should Know About Plastics and Food Safety

Asking the question, "Is Tupperware BPA-free?" might not be enough to keep you safe.

is tupperware bpa free

Tupperware isn't the only concern when it comes to BPA exposure. A recent study conducted by six nonprofit organizations revealed that 67 percent of 200 canned products had high levels of BPA.

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For all of us who have leftovers after any number of meals, this is a sensible question to ask: Is Tupperware BPA-free? First, though, it helps to understand what BPA is.

BPA stands for Bisphenol A, a chemical produced in large quantities, according to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, “for use primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins.” Various governmental agencies, health organizations, and research groups differ on their opinions of whether BPA is safe for humans and, if so, at what level of BPA exposure.

A group of researchers from the Institute of Environmental Medicine in Stockholm, Sweden, for instance, recently reviewed all the research (46 studies) on whether BPA is toxic to the developing nervous systems of newborns.[1] The results of their study were published in the medical journal Toxicology. They concluded that even though the studies have been conducted according to standardized protocols, the research “may overlook sensitive effects of BPA, and possibly other potential endocrine disruptors, especially in female offspring.”[1],

In addition to developmental toxicity, BPA has also been linked to obesity in children and adults as well as to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, reproductive disorders, breast cancer, and more.[2]

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Is Tupperware BPA-Free?

Given the differing opinions and inconclusive research results on the potential adverse health effects of BPA, many people are choosing to use BPA free plastics and avoid known sources of exposure, such as polycarbonate plastics. As mentioned previously, many plastics used for food and beverage storage are potential sources of BPA. Since Tupperware is such a popular brand of plastic food storage containers, it is not surprising how many people have questioned whether Tupperware material contains BPA.

Tupperware officially states that since 2010, they have not sold items containing BPA.[2] Here’s exactly what Tupperware states on its website (accessed on June 28, 2017):

“Tupperware follows the recommendations and guidelines of governmental regulatory agencies regarding materials that may be used in our high quality products. The Company also acknowledges the attitudes of consumers regarding products containing BPA. In its continuous search for the best materials for use in its products, Tupperware has found other materials with improved performance characteristics that have been approved by regulators to be BPA free to replace polycarbonate. As of March 2010, items sold by Tupperware US & CA are BPA free.”[3]

What is not said in this statement but is implied is that at least some of Tupperware products sold prior to 2010 did in fact contain BPA. For consumers who want to be absolutely certain they have removed all known BPA sources, old Tupperware products manufactured prior to 2010 would be suspect.

How to Reduce Exposure to BPA

While it’s virtually impossible to completely eliminate contact with BPA, you can reduce your family’s exposure to this chemical. The Environmental Working Group offers the following suggestions:

  • Limit your consumption of canned food, particularly if you are pregnant.
  • Look for canned food labeled as BPA-free or buy food packed in glass jars or waxed cardboard cartons. A few small companies sell cans lined with non-BPA alternatives.
  • Don’t use old baby bottles, cups, dishes and food containers marked with the letters “PC,” for polycarbonate, or recycling label #7, for food. Not all #7 products are polycarbonate, but they may be.
  • Do not microwave food in plastic containers.
  • Say no to receipts when possible.
  • Never give a child a receipt to hold or play with.
  • Wash your hands before preparing and eating food after handling receipts.

Why Asking “Is Tupperware BPA free?” May Not Be Enough

Some research has shown that plastic labeled BPA-free may still be unsafe. For more information on tupperware safety and why some BPA-free plastics may be just as dangerous as those with BPA, see BPA-Free Plastics Get Canned. And to learn more about the health risks of BPA and get ideas on how to reduce your BPA exposure, see the following articles:


[1] Toxicology. 2013 Sep 6;311(1-2):13-26.
[2] Reprod Toxicol. 2013 Dec;42:132-55.
[3] Tupperware website. “About BPA and Materials.” Accessed June 28, 2017.


Originally published in 2014, this article is regularly updated.

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Comments
  • @Tupperware officially states that since 2010, they have not sold items containing BPA.[2] Here’s exactly what Tupperware states on its website (accessed on Nov. 24, 2016):

    Where is the Link, please? I have not found this information on their Website.

  • Lynn G.

    Will Tupperware replace their products sold prior to 2010, since they are assumed to contain BPA?

  • Nancy c.

    I have many tupperware storage bowls and containers as well as the bright colored drink cups for children. I now have grandchildren and do not feel I can use these items. My son is 40 and he used these cups when he was small so they were purchased prior to 2010. Will Tupperware replace any of my old ideas with the new BPA free ones? Thank you for your time.

  • Tina E.

    This Is NOT Tupperware you are showing a picture of

  • Tina E.

    I would encourage EVERYONE do do some research and not take something like this for gospel. You twist things to fit your agenda, without having any facts.

  • theresa

    I personally use tupperware and have not had any bad experiances. I love the product. Those who have m sure love it . Those who dont you are missing out. Like any product its bound to go thru bad publicity. No the first not the last. I actually beieve its much more safer than all these plastics we see around.

  • theresa

    I personally use tupperware and have not had any bad experiances. I love the product. Those who have m sure love it . Those who dont you are missing out. Like any product its bound to go thru bad publicity. No the first not the last. I actually beieve its much more safer than all these plastics we see around.

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  • Francheska

    Tupperware has higher quality standards than what is required in the USA or in Europe. They run extensive tests to make sure no chemicals are released into food in the microwave or otherwise. They are the only company that I trust using.

  • It says “Tupperware follows the recommendations and guidelines of governmental regulatory agencies regarding materials that may be used in our high quality products. The Company also acknowledges the attitudes of consumers regarding products containing BPA. In its continuous search for the best materials for use in its products, Tupperware has found other materials with improved performance characteristics that have been approved by regulators to be BPA free to replace polycarbonate. As of March 2010, items sold by Tupperware US & CA are BPA free.”[3]

    What about the Tupperware sold in countries other than US or CA even after 2010??

  • Elizabeth S.

    I have a number of the Tupperware pieces that have the red colored lids. I put some raisins in one and when I opened the container a very strong odor came from the container and the raisins with a test of the odor. Checking other containers now have a slight smell. It is hard to say what the odor is. These were bought a number of years ago and still in good condition but I am worried about using them. What could I do about them.

  • Rod W.

    My wife and I were having a discussion about whether Tupperware should be kept. I commented that I had seen the staff at Goodwill throwing out donated Tupperware. My wife who is a bargain hunter countered that she has been in many used goods stores that do sell Tupperware. This has been a useful site

  • Marilyn

    Tupperware will not let you return old products that obviously stink. Odor is always an indication of plastic breakdown. I think Tupperware does not stand fully behind their warranty.

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