About the Author

Jim Brown, PhD

Jim Brown, PhD

As a former educator, Jim brings a unique perspective to health and medical writing. He has authored 14 books on health, medicine, fitness, and sports. For more than a decade he has written articles, newsletters, and special reports through Belvoir Media Group for the Cleveland Clinic, Duke University Medical Center, UCLA Health, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Over the past two decades, he served as the executive editor of the Penn State Sports Medicine Newsletter, the Georgia Tech Sports Medicine and Performance Newsletter, and Steadman Philippon Research Institute News.

Jim is a native of Louisiana and received his undergraduate degree from Baylor University. After serving in the Peace Corps in South America for two years, he received a MEd from McNeese State University and a PhD in college teaching/health education from the University of North Texas. His interest in writing developed during his tenure as a college professor, and journalism ultimately became his second career. Jim resides in Atlanta with his wife, Arlene.

Articles by Jim Brown, PhD

Headache Location Determines Its Name

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Headache Location Determines Its Name

Headache location can be on one side or both sides. They may be intermittent, episodic, or constant. Some are acute—they come and go rapidly. Others persists for days or weeks. When the exact headache location cannot be identified, it is called a generalized headache.
Where Is a Cluster Headache Location?
Cluster headaches are

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5. Easy Exercises for Foot and Ankle Health

The 15 exercises illustrated in this final chapter of Foot & Ankle Health are designed to increase circulation, range of motion, balance, strength, or a combination of all. Increase or decrease the difficulty by adjusting the:

Number of repetitions (reps)
Number of sets (the number of repetition cycles for any particular exercise

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4. Preventing Foot and Ankle Problems

As with most medical issues, it’s easier to prevent many foot and ankle problems than to treat them or live with them. As such, there are certain factors to keep in mind.
It helps if you wear the right kinds of shoes and socks, and keep your feet relatively clean.
And there

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3. Non-Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Conditions

The 17 conditions listed alphabetically in this chapter are non-orthopaedic in nature. They can affect bones, muscles, and the structures surrounding joints and can cause just as much discomfort as orthopaedic issues.
Athlete’s Foot
Athlete’s foot is more common in men than in women and more common in older adults than in

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2. Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Conditions

Orthopaedic conditions directly involve bones, muscles, and joints. Of the 38 conditions covered in this report, 20 are orthopaedic in nature and are described in this chapter. The 17 non-orthopaedic conditions are discussed in Chapter 3.
Achilles Tendinitis
The Achilles tendon runs along the back of the lower leg, connecting the calf

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1. Foot and Ankle 101

Feet and ankles are complex, strong, and durable, but not perfect or invulnerable. Your two feet may not be the same size. They get wider and longer when we stand up and can become larger than normal at the end of a day. Some people have feet with high arches,