About the Author

JoAnn Milivojevic

JoAnn Milivojevic

JoAnn Milivojevic is the Executive Editor of UCLA Healthy Years. Her mission is to help people feel better in their bodies. She does that by writing about health and wellness and teaching Pilates and yoga. As a freelance writer, she has enjoyed a satisfying career writing about everything from Caribbean travel to new medical discoveries. Among her published books are the Complete Idiot’s Guide to Back Pain and The Essential Guide to Healthy and Healing Foods. Her articles have appeared nationwide in such publications as the Chicago Tribune, American Way, Pilates Style, Baylor Innovations, and Massage Therapy Journal. She has blogged for a variety of clients, including the Chronic Disease Fund, and maintains her own blog at JoAnnMilPilates.com. Milivojevic has a Bachelor of Arts in communications from Indiana University and did graduate work in creative writing at Columbia College, Chicago. She began her career as a writer/producer for public radio and public television. In addition to loving her work as a health writer, she enjoys dancing the Argentine tango.

Articles by JoAnn Milivojevic

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The Value of Hospital Volunteerism

We tend to think of a hospital as a place to get help. But a hospital or other medical setting also provides an opportunity to assist others, even if you’re not a healthcare professional.

There are lots of places in a healthcare setting where volunteers can make a difference: People who

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Memory Changes as We Age

People often wonder if a memory lapse is age-related or something more serious. “It’s not always a clean divide,” explains Dr. Teng. “Because people live longer than they used to, it’s more challenging to discern between normal and abnormal cognitive aging. Not all memory loss is normal. Progressively worsening memory

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Don’t Let the Pain of Sciatica Linger

It may begin like a small niggling ache in your buttock. You think perhaps you bumped it and it’s just a little bruise. Then, a shooting pain extends down the back of your leg and into your toes, causing a pinpricking numbness. Sitting is painful. Walking is worse. You limp,

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New Nutrition Facts Coming Soon

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analyzed the current food labels for two years, and is now ready to debut the results. They feel the new labels will better inform and guide America’s food choices. The deadline for switching over to the new label is July 2018, although some manufacturers

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Are You Tired All the Time?

If you are frequently exhausted during the day, you may suspect a sleep disorder. And while it’s a good place to start, there may be some other reasons for your daytime tiredness.

“Fatigue and sleepiness are two different things,” explains clinical psychologist Jennifer Martin, PhD, David Geffen School of Medicine at

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Worred About “Senior Moments”?

Chances are you’ve walked into a room and suddenly forgotten what you were looking for. Or perhaps during a conversation, a certain word eluded you. Those episodes, often dubbed “senior moments,” are generally just temporary lapses in memory.

“If we compare people in their 20s with older people, the younger people

Is It Stress—or an Anxiety Disorder?

Daily

Is It Stress—or an Anxiety Disorder?

Sweaty palms, fast heartbeat, a pit in your stomach…. we’ve all been there. Feeling anxious is a normal response to the many stressful situations in life. But some people tend toward these physical reactions and catastrophic thinking more frequently than others, making negativity their go-to emotional reaction to any challenging

Is Alzheimer’s Hereditary?

Daily

Is Alzheimer’s Hereditary?

There are two types of Alzheimer’s disease—early-onset and late-onset. Both types have a genetic component, which leaves anyone who has relatives diagnosed with the condition wondering, “Is Alzheimer’s hereditary?” First, keep in mind that this is a very complex disease. Though your risk is higher if you have a family

Is Depression Hereditary?

Daily

Is Depression Hereditary?

Science shows there’s a genetic component to depression that makes people more susceptible to the disorder. So is depression hereditary?

Just because you carry the genes doesn’t mean you’ll develop the disease. Your genetic makeup helps determine how likely you are to develop depression if other factors related to the