Inflammation Causes & Effects: Acute vs. chronic inflammation, joint inflammation, fatigue and inflammation, and anti-inflammatory foods

How inflammation acts as your body’s best defense against illness and injuries; why your defense network can go haywire causing severe inflammation; and the steps you can take to tame it.

Inflammation is one of your body’s automatic responses to illness and injury. Chemicals act to stimulate blood flow to the affected area, starting the healing process. The resulting acute inflammation is your body’s defense mechanism where your immune system responds to a threat, neutralizes it, and then returns to normal. 

But what happens if the inflammation persists? How and why can an infection or injury produce chronic inflammation? Are there ways to combat chronic inflammation? What can you do to prevent chronic inflammation?

You’ll get the answers to these questions and more in a new FREE downloadable guide, Inflammation Causes & Effects: Acute vs. chronic inflammation, joint inflammation, fatigue and inflammation, and anti-inflammatory foods. Written by the editors of University Health News, Inflammation Causes & Effects details the condition’s causes and remedies. And clarifies common confusion surrounding inflammation.

The dangers of chronic inflammation

Chronic inflammation often does not show warning signs. And when it does, its symptoms vary depending on the area of the body affected. Essentially, you probably won’t know you have chronic inflammation until you develop symptoms of an inflammatory disease, such as the aching joints of rheumatoid arthritis or the diarrhea and other signs of ulcerative colitis. This is why it’s essential to make changes to your lifestyle and health habits now. Let Inflammation Causes & Effects be your guide to improvement.

Inflammation shows up as a marker and symptom in more and more serious illnesses and diseases. In Inflammation Causes & Effects you’ll read about the latest news and studies connecting inflammation with atherosclerosis, heart attacks and stroke. You’ll also get information on the link between cancer and inflammation. And how scientists and doctors are researching relationships connecting depression and neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation. Skin ailments, diabetes, digestive disorders, fatigue and more are all also covered.

What conditions promote chronic inflammation? Can chronic inflammation be prevented?

There are several ways to reduce your risk of chronic inflammation. The first is your diet. Processed foods, high-fat meats, refined carbohydrates, and sugars are among the foods promoting inflammation. Learn ways to avoid these foods and replace them with anti-inflammatory options, in Inflammation Causes & Effects.

An anti-inflammatory diet is one rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and also includes a bounty of antioxidant vitamins A and C as well as vitamins B6 and K, fiber, and potassium. But which fruits are best? Can fruit juice be an effective substitute for whole fruits? Do all types of fish offer anti-inflammatory benefits? Where can you find whole grains? And why you need to be wary of some food packaging and marketing claims.

Learn how easy it can be to shift your diet away from inflammation-promoting foods and toward an anti-inflammatory diet that is healthy and tasty. Inflammation Causes & Effects is your resource.

Additional lifestyle changes to reduce your inflammation risk

In addition to your diet, there are other lifestyle changes you can make to reduce the onset and minimize the damaging effects of chronic inflammation. A daily 30-minute walk is an easy and enjoyable way to reduce the negative impact of inflammation. Improving your daytime routine to encourage a better night’s sleep is another way to reduce inflammation. Taming stress and anxiety with self-management techniques like meditation, calming breathing routines, and regular exercise.

Start your defense against inflammation with smart diet and lifestyle choices. You’ll not only feel better but get protection against the hidden disease dangers lurking in your body. Let the free guide from University Health News, Inflammation Causes & Effects show you easy ways to minimize inflammation’s effects on your body.

Comments
  • Marilyn K.

    Where exactly on a dexscan does a T-score of – 0.8 fall on the chart

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