Tag: whole grain stamp

Identifying Whole Grains

Identifying Whole Grains

Most health experts agree that prioritizing whole grains is a key element of a healthy dietary pattern. Aim for at least three servings of whole grains each day. One serving of whole grains is equivalent to 16 grams (a little more than half an ounce). While it’s easy to see

How to Get the Best Cooking Results with Whole Grains

There are numerous reasons why the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggests that you make half your daily grain servings whole grains. Quinoa, brown rice, barley, oats, and other whole grains deliver more nutrients than refined grains, and because of their nutrient density, studies have linked whole-grain consumption to better

4. Fill Up with Fiber

Grains and legumes sometimes get a bad rap. For some, it’s because of the belief that carbohydrates cause weight gain. For others, it’s because of the idea that humans didn’t evolve to eat agriculture-based foods like grains and legumes. Yes, whole grains and legumes (beans, lentils, peas, and soybeans) contain

3. The Foods You Need

Nutrition scientists often differentiate between “energy-dense” and “nutrient-dense” foods. In terms of nutrition, “energy” equals calories, so foods that are energy-dense contain a lot of calories for the amount of food—sugar, for example, which packs 773 calories per cup. The same amount of a non-energy dense food like chopped carrots,

6. Fiber-Rich Grains Aid Healthy Aging

A component found in many plant foods that has been linked with being disease- and disability-free in older age might surprise you: It’s dietary fiber. Researchers who followed some 1,600 initially healthy people, ages 49 and older, for 10 years reported that those with the highest intake of fiber had

3. Whole-Grain Superfoods

Whole grains are a top source of complex, unrefined carbohydrates (carbs) that provide your body with a slowly released, steady supply of energy. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend getting at least half of your grain servings from whole grains, which is three daily servings of whole grains for the

Managing Diabetes

To avoid an insulin spike, people with diabetes often focus on monitoring a food’s glycemic index (GI)—which measures how rapidly foods boost blood glucose and then ranks them. However, monitoring just your GI can be misleading, says Maryanne Richardson, a registered dietitian nutritionist and a certified diabetes educator at Weill

5. Whole Grains and Fiber

Fiber from Grains
The recommended amount of fiber is 25 grams per day for women ages 18 to 50 and 38 grams for men ages 18 to 50. Calorie needs decrease as you get older, and so does the recommendation for fiber; for women and men over age 50, it drops

4. Seeds Of Good Health

Grains, legumes (beans, peas, soybeans, and lentils), nuts, and seeds are all packed with nutrients. When you incorporate these foods into your diet, they deliver B vitamins that help drive your metabolism to keep you energized, antioxidants to protect your cells, and dietary fiber to help with blood sugar control

3. Foods For Your Heart and Brain

When choosing foods that will benefit both your heart and brain, it pays to think in terms of tradeoffs. Even healthy foods contain calories, and if you eat too many calories, you will gain weight and increase your risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline. That’s why nutrition experts advise

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