Tag: whole grain foods

3. Key Components of Healthy Dietary Patterns

The Healthy U.S.-Style Eating Pattern. The Healthy Mediterranean-Style Eating Pattern. The Healthy Vegetarian Eating Pattern. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.
These dietary plans might have different names, but they share many common traits—namely, they emphasize consumption of a variety of foods from plants, lean protein sources (from plants

Why Am I Always Hungry, Even After I Eat?

Why Am I Always Hungry, Even After I Eat?

“Why am I always hungry?” Is that a question you often ask yourself, even after meals? Feeling hungry after eating could be due to leptin resistance. Leptin, a hormone produced by body fat, controls whether or not you feel full after eating.

Someone with normal leptin function will not feel hunger

Identifying Whole Grains

Identifying Whole Grains

Most health experts agree that prioritizing whole grains is a key element of a healthy dietary pattern. Aim for at least three servings of whole grains each day. One serving of whole grains is equivalent to 16 grams (a little more than half an ounce). While it’s easy to see

Are Carbs Bad for You?

Are Carbs Bad for You?

Some people claim that carbohydrates are fattening, while others say they trigger cravings. The underlying question is: Are carbs bad for you?

The important point to remember is that all carbs are not created equal. Although most people are aware that carbs are in bread, cereal, pasta, potatoes, sweets, and soda,

4. Fill Up with Fiber

Grains and legumes sometimes get a bad rap. For some, it’s because of the belief that carbohydrates cause weight gain. For others, it’s because of the idea that humans didn’t evolve to eat agriculture-based foods like grains and legumes. Yes, whole grains and legumes (beans, lentils, peas, and soybeans) contain

3. The Foods You Need

Nutrition scientists often differentiate between “energy-dense” and “nutrient-dense” foods. In terms of nutrition, “energy” equals calories, so foods that are energy-dense contain a lot of calories for the amount of food—sugar, for example, which packs 773 calories per cup. The same amount of a non-energy dense food like chopped carrots,

9. Diseases and Disorders of the Colon

After the small intestine, digested food moves through the six-foot-long large intestine (also known as the colon) where water, some nutrients, and electrolytes are absorbed. The remaining solid waste then travels from the colon into the rectum as stool. It is in the colon where people suffer from many of

3. Whole-Grain Superfoods

Whole grains are a top source of complex, unrefined carbohydrates (carbs) that provide your body with a slowly released, steady supply of energy. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend getting at least half of your grain servings from whole grains, which is three daily servings of whole grains for the

Gluten and Your Gut

In recent years, the number of “gluten-free” food products has grown substantially. That’s because gluten—a type of protein found in wheat, barley, triticale, and rye—can trigger a host of unpleasant symptoms, including diarrhea and abdominal pain, in people who have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.

However, skipping gluten isn’t necessarily a

Managing the Discomfort of Diverticulitis

It is estimated that about half of all Americans aged 60 to 80 have diverticulosis, a condition in which diverticula—small pouches about the size of large peas—bulge outward from the colon. Those numbers increase in the oldest old, with almost everybody age 80 and older having the condition, according to

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