virus

View From Duke Health: Coronavirus Insights

DukeMedicine HealthNews: What have we learned about how COVID-19 spreads? Nicholas Turner, MD, MHSc: Novel coronavirus poses a few challenges. Compared to other respiratory viruses (including SARS from 2003), it has a higher transmission rate, can be spread while symptoms are still mild or have yet to develop, and may … Read More

No Gym, No Problem

Chances are your local fitness center is closed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. If it’s not, you’re wise not to work out in a crowded gym populated by people breathing heavily, exhaling saliva droplets, and touching the same exercise equipment as you—essentially, the equivalent of pumping iron in a … Read More

When Will COVID-19 End?

On Monday, March 16, President Trump predicted that the COVID-19 outbreak could go on until July or August, prompting a collective gasp among Americans who had been hoping for a quicker resolution. While there are too many variables at play to know for sure when this will end, experts are … Read More

Liver Pain: What It Could Mean

The liver doesn’t actually contain nerves, so the organ itself can’t feel pain. Even so, the sensation of liver pain can occur because the layer of tissue that surrounds the organ—it’s called Glisson’s Capsule—does contain nerves. Any diseases affecting the liver that increase its size can result in what feels … Read More

Bristol Stool Chart: What It Can Tell You About Your Health

Do you use the Bristol Stool Chart?’ The Bristol Stool Chart is a human-poop evaluation guide developed at the British Royal Infirmary in 1997. It can help you determine if your feces are normal. The Bristol Stool Chart—also called the Bristol Stool Scale—s widely used in clinical settings, especially with … Read More

Who Should Get a Flu Shot?

Everyone can benefit from getting a flu shot, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend vaccinating everyone six months of age and older. For people age 65 and older, Medicare covers annual flu shots, including the high-dose version. Many health insurance plans also cover flu shots with … Read More

Managing Shingles ­Naturally

Shingles—officially known as herpes zoster—is an infection of a nerve and the area of skin supplied by the nerve. It is caused by the varicella zoster virus, a virus in the herpes family that also causes chickenpox. After a person has chickenpox, some virus particles remain inactive in the nerve … Read More

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