Tag: osteopenia

Osteopenia is a close relative of the bone-weakening disease, osteoporosis. It, too, is bone mineral density that is lower than normal, but it?s not low enough to qualify for a diagnosis of osteoporosis. If you have osteopenia, it?s important to strengthen your bones, because you are at greater risk for osteoporosis and bone fractures in the future.

Your risk for osteopenia increases as you age, because bones begin to break down faster as you get older. In women, the rate of bone loss speeds up dramatically after menopause because the body no longer produces the hormone estrogen, which helps build bones. Other risk factors include a family history of osteoporosis and a slim body frame. You may also be more prone to thinning bones if you?ve had an eating disorder like anorexia, you received radiation or chemotherapy to treat cancer, or you took steroid medicine to treat an autoimmune disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Osteopenia doesn?t cause any symptoms. You might not realize you have weak bones until the condition progresses and you develop a fracture. Your doctor can diagnose osteopenia and osteoporosis with a bone density test, called a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. This test compares the mineral content, or density, of your bones against those of a younger person of your gender. The result is reported as a T-score. A T-score of between -1.0 and -2.5 means you have osteopenia. A score of -2.5 or lower means you have osteoporosis.

If your bone density is low, your doctor will recommend that you start doing more weight-bearing exercises, such as walking or dancing. Nutritional interventions include getting more calcium and vitamin D, and limiting caffeine and alcohol. Bone-building medicines such as alendronate (Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel), or raloxifene (Evista) may also be an option.

What a DXA Scan Can Reveal About Your Bone Health and Fracture Risk

Some common health concerns among postmenopausal women include breast cancer, heart attack, and stroke—but a medical condition that is more common than all of these is often overlooked. The condition is osteoporosis—weak, brittle bones that put you at high risk of suffering a bone fracture.

“More women suffer osteoporotic fractures each

10 Vitamin D Deficiency Symptoms You Can Identify Yourself

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Vitamin D deficiency symptoms have been linked to numerous health problems, including heart disease, depression, and even cancer.[1] Here are 10 signs you’re not getting enough vitamin D:

Depression or anxiety
Bone softening (low bone density) or fractures
Fatigue and generalized weakness
Muscle cramps and weakness
Joint pain (most noticeable

Emergency Room Secrets: Falls, Fractures, and “FDGB”

Emergency Room Secrets: Falls, Fractures, and “FDGB”

“FDGB” is a common occurrence in the Emergency Department setting. The first question is: How common and varied is FGDB? The second question is: Exactly what is FDGB? Our emergency room secrets include the story behind that code.

You see, in medicine we use mnemonics, abbreviations, and medical slang like they’re

Are You at Risk for Osteopenia? Symptoms May Not Tell the Story

Are You at Risk for Osteopenia? Symptoms May Not Tell the Story

Osteopenia isn’t as serious as osteoporosis—see our posts defining bone loss test scores of osteoporosis -2.5 or osteoporosis -3.0. But it’s also not easy to detect; there aren’t any obvious osteopenia symptoms.

Certain factors, however, can make you vulnerable to osteopenia, meaning that it’s important to preserve your bone density. Specifically,

21 Calcium Deficiency Symptoms That Will Surprise You

21 Calcium Deficiency Symptoms That Will Surprise You

Calcium, the most abundant mineral in the human body, is best known for its important role in bone health and protection from osteoporosis. However, in addition to its key role in imparting strength to bones and teeth, calcium plays a critical role as a messenger in cell-signaling pathways throughout the

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We typically think of muscular dystrophy as a singular disease. But, per the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, it’s more complex than that: “The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of more than 30 genetic diseases characterized by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal muscles that control

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