myoclonus

Ouch! Nocturnal Leg Cramps—and How to Stop Them

Up to 60 percent of adults have had nocturnal leg cramps.[1] These recurrent, painful cramps usually strike the calf muscles and can cause frequent awakenings and severe insomnia. They are more common in people aged 50 years and older. If you’ve suffered through them, read on to learn how to … Read More

Myoclonus: An Innocent Twitch—or a Serious Illness?

What is myoclonus? According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, myoclonus “refers to sudden, involuntary jerking of a muscle or group of muscles.” It is a symptom, not a disease, affecting 8.6 people per 100,000 in its more serious presentations. A myoclonic twitch or a myoclonic jerk—when … Read More

Sleep Stages: Understanding the Sleep Cycle

One-third of all American adults are not getting enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But why does it matter so much? Well, simply put: Inadequate sleep is bad for your health. It's linked to chronic conditions and illnesses like diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and depression. … Read More

7 Natural Restless Leg Syndrome Treatment Options

We all get antsy from time to time and feel the need to get up and move around. But for people who suffer from restless leg syndrome, these feelings aren’t just an occasional bother. The urge to move and the uncomfortable, even painful, sensations in the legs and other parts … Read More

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treatment: Hope Lies Ahead

Studies published in 2015 shed new light on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and, thus, chronic fatigue syndrome treatment. The condition, known medically as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), appears to be a biological disorder, not a psychological issue, as determined in multiple studies, including recent work by scientists at Columbia University and … Read More

Eye Twitching: Harmless Annoyance… or a Cause for Concern?

Occasional eye twitching is a benign but annoying condition. It often lasts only a few minutes to an hour, usually involves only one eyelid, and is related to fatigue, stress, or both. A relaxing maneuver—even a stress-releasing giggle at its arrival—can sometimes end the involuntary eye twitching. But eye twitching … Read More

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