Tag: mild cognitive

Let’s Get Serious About Sleep

Missing out on sleep can have serious consequences for the body and the brain—including possibly setting the stage for cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to a new study. However, by learning a few sensible sleep strategies, you can improve the likelihood of a brain-healthy night’s rest.

Sleep disturbances—having difficulty

Sensory Changes: Are They Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) not only dulls the mind, but it is also associated with a dulling of the senses that provide our brains with information about the world around us. Experts have found that any of the five senses—hearing, vision, taste, smell, and even touch—may show signs of negative changes

Brain Fog: What It Can Tell Us About Our Health

Brain Fog: What It Can Tell Us About Our Health

Ahh, brain fog. Why do you toy with me so? The other day I looked everywhere for my car keys. I was rushing so I could drop off my kids at school (finally!) when I realized they were missing (the keys, not the kids). I searched frantically: the kitchen, the

Lack of Inhibitory Control—A Sign of Possible Brain Problems

Some decline in a person’s ability to exercise inhibitory control—an important brain function that allows people to suppress actions and resist interference from irrelevant stimuli—is normal with increasing age. But significant change appears to signal incipient brain problems and may make earlier diagnosis of neurodegenerative processes possible, research suggests..
A small

Can a Common Hormone Improve Cognition in Aging Brains?

A hormone called growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) appears to have the ability to improve brain function in healthy older adults, as well as in people who show early signs of cognitive decline. Preliminary research published in the Aug. 6, 2012 issue of the Archives of Neurology suggests that daily doses

5 Great Ways to Fire Up Your Brain

Abundant research has found an association between frequent engagement in brain-challenging activities such as puzzles, games, and writing, and a sharper brain in older age. A new study suggests that these activities may actually change the structure of the brain, helping to preserve its vital communications network.
Scientists interviewed 152 healthy

×
Enter Your Log In Credentials
This setting should only be used on your home or work computer.

×
×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps people live more sustainable, self-reliant lives, with feature stories on tending the garden, managing the homestead, raising healthy livestock and more!

This setting should only be used on your home or work computer.

×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps the small-scale poultry enthusiast raise healthy, happy, productive flocks for eggs, meat or fun - from the countryside to the urban homestead!

This setting should only be used on your home or work computer.