heart muscle

Defining Heart Failure

The American Heart Association (AHA) defines heart failure as a condition in which the heart does not pump blood as efficiently as it should. As a result, the heart cannot keep up with its workload, preventing the body from getting enough oxygen to operate normally. In some cases, the heart … Read More

Tightness in Chest: Does It Always Signal a Heart Attack?

It may be a classic heart-attack symptom, but pressure or discomfort or tightness in your chest doesn’t always accompany a heart attack. For some people, particularly women, pain in other places may be their main symptoms. For others, chest discomfort comes and goes—the result of a condition called angina, which … Read More

Is a Low Heart Rate Dangerous?

A low heart rate may be a sign of an efficiently working heart. Or, if the rate becomes too slow, a low heart rate could be a sign of health complications down the road. A normal or healthy resting heart rate for an adult is between 60 and 100 beats … Read More

Blood Pressure Chart: Where Do Your Numbers Fit?

A nurse takes your blood pressure at your annual physical. The numbers are recorded and the checkup continues. But do you know where on the blood pressure chart your levels are? Are they healthy? Too low? Too high, meaning you have hypertension? If you have high blood pressure or are … Read More

Silent Heart Attack: What It Means and How to React

The phrase “silent heart attack” suggests an event that comes and goes without much fanfare. And while it’s true you can have an actual heart attack without realizing it at the time, the signs of a silent heart attack can include real damage to your heart muscle. “Just like the … Read More

Mild Heart Attack Symptoms: What Do They Mean?

What is a "mild heart attack"? You may have heard the expression and wondered exactly what it means. A bone can have a hairline fracture or a major break. A stroke can have relatively minor consequences or be severely debilitating. So can a heart attack be mild or major? The … Read More

Enter Your Login Credentials
This setting should only be used on your home or work computer.

×