heart health

Heart disease remains the number one killer of both men and women, ahead of cancer, diabetes, and accidents. In people with heart disease, blood vessels become narrowed or blocked, reducing blood flow to the heart and brain, and increasing the risk for heart attack and stroke. Risks for heart disease include obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Preventing or managing these conditions can improve heart health and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

You may not realize you?re at risk for high blood pressure and heart disease, because high blood pressure symptoms usually don?t emerge until blood pressure has already reached a dangerous level. That?s why this disease is often termed a ?silent killer.? At the dangerous stage, high blood pressure symptoms can include shortness of breath, nosebleeds, and severe headache.

Having high blood pressure over time forces the heart to work harder. Eventually, the heart begins to grow?a condition known as enlarged heart. If an enlarged heart isn?t treated with medicine, devices, or surgery, it can lead to complications such as heart failure.

Some people with an enlarged heart develop a heart murmur?a whooshing or swishing sound caused by abnormal blood flow through the heart. A heart murmur isn?t necessarily dangerous, but doctors do monitor it because it can be a sign of an underlying heart condition.

In heart disease, a sticky substance called plaque builds up in the arteries. When an area of plaque breaks off and becomes lodged in a blood vessel that supplies the heart, it can block blood flow and cause part of the heart muscle to die. This is a heart attack. Heart attack symptoms include chest pain; discomfort in the arms, back, shoulders, and neck; shortness of breath; and nausea.

Poor blood flow to the heart can produce chest pain called angina. Although angina is not a heart attack, it is a sign of heart disease and can warn of a future heart attack. Other angina symptoms include discomfort in the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, and back.

Yoga for Sleep Improvement

Exercise can be useful for normalizing sleep patterns. Exercise not only burns calories and body fat, it also helps to reduce stress and raises body temperature, potentially promoting deep sleep at night. Engaging in yoga for sleep improvement, in particular, has even more benefits on your overall health.

An analysis of … Read More

Signs of Depression Relapse and How to Prevent Them

One of the most important, yet most neglected, aspects of depression treatment is preventing depression from returning. Relapse refers to the returning signs of depression after a period of weeks or months of doing well. The term recurrence sometimes refers to a relapse that occurs late, after many months … Read More

Arthritis: Making the Diagnosis

Once your medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests have been evaluated, your medical provider may diagnose you with one of the following types of arthritis. It also is possible that you may be diagnosed with a multisystem disorder.

Degenerative Arthritis

OA is the main cause of degenerative arthritis. It can affect … Read More

Is Ice Cream Bad for You?

It happened just like that. You sat on the couch, spoon in hand, to enjoy a few spoonfuls of your favorite ice cream. Suddenly, you were staring down the barrel of an empty carton, with remnants of Rocky Road splattered on your chin. “Not again,” you cried. As you pondered … Read More

14 Memory Improvement Tips to Try Now

Although research has yet to uncover a means of preventing Alzheimer’s, there is evidence that actively engaging your mind to “cement memories” can help preserve them as you age. And the earlier you start working on your memory, the better. Below, we outline some memory improvement tips that may help … Read More

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