Tag: heart health

Heart disease remains the number one killer of both men and women, ahead of cancer, diabetes, and accidents. In people with heart disease, blood vessels become narrowed or blocked, reducing blood flow to the heart and brain, and increasing the risk for heart attack and stroke. Risks for heart disease include obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Preventing or managing these conditions can improve heart health and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

You may not realize you?re at risk for high blood pressure and heart disease, because high blood pressure symptoms usually don?t emerge until blood pressure has already reached a dangerous level. That?s why this disease is often termed a ?silent killer.? At the dangerous stage, high blood pressure symptoms can include shortness of breath, nosebleeds, and severe headache.

Having high blood pressure over time forces the heart to work harder. Eventually, the heart begins to grow?a condition known as enlarged heart. If an enlarged heart isn?t treated with medicine, devices, or surgery, it can lead to complications such as heart failure.

Some people with an enlarged heart develop a heart murmur?a whooshing or swishing sound caused by abnormal blood flow through the heart. A heart murmur isn?t necessarily dangerous, but doctors do monitor it because it can be a sign of an underlying heart condition.

In heart disease, a sticky substance called plaque builds up in the arteries. When an area of plaque breaks off and becomes lodged in a blood vessel that supplies the heart, it can block blood flow and cause part of the heart muscle to die. This is a heart attack. Heart attack symptoms include chest pain; discomfort in the arms, back, shoulders, and neck; shortness of breath; and nausea.

Poor blood flow to the heart can produce chest pain called angina. Although angina is not a heart attack, it is a sign of heart disease and can warn of a future heart attack. Other angina symptoms include discomfort in the shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, and back.

Arthritis Exercises to Promote Healing, Range of Motion

Arthritis Exercises to Promote Healing, Range of Motion

The pain, stiffness, and restricted movement that accompany arthritis may seem like a good reason to curl up in bed, but exercise is beneficial in mild-to-moderate arthritis. Arthritis exercise benefits include:

Healing. Exercise increases blood circulation and oxygenation within joint tissue, promoting repair.
Lower risk of complications. Exercise helps protect

The Healthiest Fruits to Add to Your Diet

The Healthiest Fruits to Add to Your Diet

While all fruits are healthy choices, here is a selection of what is considered as the healthiest fruits. These sweet selections have the most documented health benefits in scientific studies.
Apples
One medium fresh apple has only 95 calories, yet it is rich in vitamin C and fiber, including a type of

Sleep Stages: Understanding the Sleep Cycle

Sleep Stages: Understanding the Sleep Cycle

One-third of all American adults are not getting enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But why does it matter so much? Well, simply put: Inadequate sleep is bad for your health. It’s linked to chronic conditions and illnesses like diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and depression.

Study: Depression, Anxiety Are Risk Factors for Physical Health Ailments

Your doctor may check your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and other standard health risk factors at your annual checkup. But if you’re not being asked about your mood, an important predictor of health problems is being overlooked.

In a study published recently in Health Psychology researchers found that depression and anxiety

Cold Weather Can Increase Heart Attack Risk

Many people notice that the weather affects how they feel. Rain may make joints ache, dark days may cause dark moods, and barometric pressure changes can cause headaches. Now, a study published in the November 2018 issue of JAMA Cardiology reports that the weather may be associated with heart attacks,

Why the Low-Fat Diet Failed

In the 1980s and 1990s, Americans were told that eating less fat would reduce risk for cardiovascular disease and obesity. Why didn’t it work? Essentially, reducing total fat led to intake of more refined carbohydrates and less healthy fats, and both of these changes had negative health impacts.

Evolving Guidelines: Dietary

Fish Oil: A Quick Fix for Your Heart Health?

About 8 percent of Americans take fish oil supplements, likely due to research suggesting they may help protect heart health. However, two trials published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Nov. 10, 2018, show mixed results on the benefits of fish oil. If you’re taking it, should you

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