Tag: copd

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (or COPD, for short) is a lung condition that makes it harder to breathe. COPD is not one, but two conditions: emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

What is emphysema? It?s a disease in which the air sacs of the lungs become damaged. Normally, as air travels from the mouth through the airways, it flows into air sacs called alveoli. These sacs stretch and fill up like tiny balloons. Oxygen from the air passes through the alveoli walls into the bloodstream. Carbon dioxide from the blood passes out through the alveoli to be removed via exhalation.

In emphysema, the air sacs lose their stretchiness and their walls are destroyed. This damage makes it harder for the lungs to absorb oxygen. In chronic bronchitis, the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and thickens. Sticky mucus forms, which blocks the airways and interferes with normal breathing.

Typical COPD signs and symptoms are a cough that produces a lot of phlegm, shortness of breath, chest pain and tightness, and wheezing. Chronic bronchitis symptoms include many of these same signs?especially a cough and shortness of breath.

Because most COPD cases are caused by exposure to smoke, the first step in treating the condition is to stop smoking. Medicines can relieve the cough, shortness of breath, and other COPD symptoms. Bronchodilators relax the muscles of the airways, opening them up to make it easier to breathe. Steroid medicines bring down inflammation in the airways. These medicines are typically breathed in through a device called an inhaler.

People with very low oxygen levels in their blood may need to breathe oxygen through a mask or a cannula in the nose. Some people use oxygen only during exertion, such as when exercising. Others need it throughout the day. One way for people with COPD to improve their quality of life is by taking part in a program called pulmonary rehabilitation. In this program, a team of nurses, physical therapists, and other specialists offer exercise and diet tips, along with other strategies to help manage the disease.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (or COPD, for short) is a lung condition that makes it harder to breathe. COPD is not one, but two conditions: emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

What is emphysema? It?s a disease in which the air sacs of the lungs become damaged. Normally, as air travels from the mouth through the airways, it flows into air sacs called alveoli. These sacs stretch and fill up like tiny balloons. Oxygen from the air passes through the alveoli walls into the bloodstream. Carbon dioxide from the blood passes out through the alveoli to be removed via exhalation.

In emphysema, the air sacs lose their stretchiness and their walls are destroyed. This damage makes it harder for the lungs to absorb oxygen. In chronic bronchitis, the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and thickens. Sticky mucus forms, which blocks the airways and interferes with normal breathing.

Typical COPD signs and symptoms are a cough that produces a lot of phlegm, shortness of breath, chest pain and tightness, and wheezing. Chronic bronchitis symptoms include many of these same signs?especially a cough and shortness of breath.

Because most COPD cases are caused by exposure to smoke, the first step in treating the condition is to stop smoking. Medicines can relieve the cough, shortness of breath, and other COPD symptoms. Bronchodilators relax the muscles of the airways, opening them up to make it easier to breathe. Steroid medicines bring down inflammation in the airways. These medicines are typically breathed in through a device called an inhaler.

People with very low oxygen levels in their blood may need to breathe oxygen through a mask or a cannula in the nose. Some people use oxygen only during exertion, such as when exercising. Others need it throughout the day. One way for people with COPD to improve their quality of life is by taking part in a program called pulmonary rehabilitation. In this program, a team of nurses, physical therapists, and other specialists offer exercise and diet tips, along with other strategies to help manage the disease.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (or COPD, for short) is a lung condition that makes it harder to breathe. COPD is not one, but two conditions: emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

What is emphysema? It?s a disease in which the air sacs of the lungs become damaged. Normally, as air travels from the mouth through the airways, it flows into air sacs called alveoli. These sacs stretch and fill up like tiny balloons. Oxygen from the air passes through the alveoli walls into the bloodstream. Carbon dioxide from the blood passes out through the alveoli to be removed via exhalation.

In emphysema, the air sacs lose their stretchiness and their walls are destroyed. This damage makes it harder for the lungs to absorb oxygen. In chronic bronchitis, the lining of the airways becomes inflamed and thickens. Sticky mucus forms, which blocks the airways and interferes with normal breathing.

Typical COPD signs and symptoms are a cough that produces a lot of phlegm, shortness of breath, chest pain and tightness, and wheezing. Chronic bronchitis symptoms include many of these same signs?especially a cough and shortness of breath.

Because most COPD cases are caused by exposure to smoke, the first step in treating the condition is to stop smoking. Medicines can relieve the cough, shortness of breath, and other COPD symptoms. Bronchodilators relax the muscles of the airways, opening them up to make it easier to breathe. Steroid medicines bring down inflammation in the airways. These medicines are typically breathed in through a device called an inhaler.

People with very low oxygen levels in their blood may need to breathe oxygen through a mask or a cannula in the nose. Some people use oxygen only during exertion, such as when exercising. Others need it throughout the day. One way for people with COPD to improve their quality of life is by taking part in a program called pulmonary rehabilitation. In this program, a team of nurses, physical therapists, and other specialists offer exercise and diet tips, along with other strategies to help manage the disease.

How to Quit Smoking: 6 Steps to Success

How to Quit Smoking: 6 Steps to Success

Unless you live under a rock, you know that smoking is bad for your health. Tobacco-related diseases kill more than 480,000 people each year in the United States alone, accounting for around 20 percent of all premature deaths. If you’re a smoker, the habit can shorten your life by up

10. Conclusion

Unless we can breathe, we cannot live. That’s why it behooves us to treat our lungs with respect by not smoking or inhaling any unnecessary products, and by avoiding air pollution whenever possible. These simple measures can help prevent the majority of cases of COPD, the most common form of

How to Prevent Smoking Diseases—and Add Years to Your Life

How to Prevent Smoking Diseases—and Add Years to Your Life

The number of Americans who smoke has fallen to 14.9 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—a big drop from 1997, when 25 percent of Americans smoked.

Sadly, however, smoking still kills about half a million Americans annually, and it isn’t just the obvious smoking diseases (like

COPD Signs and Symptoms: How to Find Help

COPD Signs and Symptoms: How to Find Help

Those at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may wonder, “Is COPD fatal?” While there is no cure, it’s important to keep in mind that when you’re dealing with COPD signs and symptoms, various treatment approaches can help you avoid complications.

Some strategies are as straightforward as getting immunized against

7. Influenza

Influenza—commonly called the flu—is a viral infection of the respiratory system. It affects the lungs, as well as the whole body. Most people who get the flu come down with it during “flu season,” which runs from November to March. Children are more susceptible to getting the flu, and often

6. Bronchiectasis

Bronchiectasis is a chronic obstructive airway disease in which the bronchi become damaged and easily collapse. Bronchi walls contain elastic and muscle fibers, which allow the bronchial tubes to expand and contract while maintaining their shape. In people with bronchiectasis, the elastic and muscular components in the walls of medium-sized

5. Asthma

Asthma is a chronic disease that often starts in childhood but can occur for the first time in adulthood, even later in life. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 18.4 million adults and 6.2 million children in the United States have asthma.
Asthma causes inflammation in the

4. Treating COPD

Even though COPD cannot be cured, it can be treated. Treatment is aimed at reducing symptoms, preventing the disease from getting worse, improving the ability to exercise, preventing and treating complications, and preventing and treating exacerbations.
For those with COPD who are current smokers, the most important first step is to

3. Diagnosing COPD

COPD and asthma share many of the same symptoms (primarily coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath), which occur because normal airflow into and out of the lungs is obstructed. This can make it difficult to distinguish between the two conditions. However, it is important to make an accurate diagnosis because

2. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Until recently, the term “chronic obstructive pulmonary disease” (COPD) was used to describe two conditions—emphysema and chronic bronchitis—that make it difficult to breathe in and out. In 2017, the Global Initiative on Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) updated its census report on the diagnosis, prevention, and management of COPD to reflect

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