Tag: cancer research

Cooking with Crucifers: Delicious Vegetable Side Dish Ideas

Cruciferous vegetables are high in several nutrients and can play a significant role in maintaining your health. These vegetables, which include cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi, cauliflower, turnips, collard greens, watercress, radishes, and rutabaga, “are a rich source of fiber, vitamins A, C, K, and folate, and minerals like

Research Roundup: Mediterranean Diet; Dairy Fat; Colorectal Cancer

Med Diet May Lower Depression Risk
Following a healthy diet, like the Mediterranean diet, that avoids pro-inflammatory foods may protect against depression, researchers report. More than 40 studies were included in the meta-analysis where adherence to diet was measured. Higher adherence to an anti-inflammatory diet, which includes higher consumption of fruit,

Processed Meats and Cancer: It’s Not Just Nitrates

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), about 34,000 cancer deaths per year worldwide are attributable to diets high in processed meats. While that number pales in comparison to the one million or so global cancer deaths related to smoking, it is significant enough to warrant a hard look at

2. Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the second-most-common cancer in men (after skin cancer) and the second-most-common cause of cancer-related death in men (after lung cancer). Latest data from the American Cancer Society: One in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, and one in 41 will die from

The Scoop: Sugar and Cancer Risk

The Scoop: Sugar and Cancer Risk

It’s true that glucose, the form of sugar that circulates in your blood, is fuel for cancer cells, but healthy cells need glucose too. The rapid growth of cancer cells means they need more fuel than normal cells. Thus, some people have suggested that avoiding all sugar could “starve” cancer

News Briefs: Prostate Cancer Screening; Kidney Tumor Surgery

Prostate Cancer Screening Has Minimal Effect on Mortality
Prostate cancer screening using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test has no effect on overall mortality, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in BMJ in September. Furthermore, the screening is associated with biopsy-related and cancer treatment–related complications that include sepsis, urinary

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