anti inflammatory drugs

Does Glucosamine Work for Knee Pain?

If you’re still confused about all the conflicting messages about joint pain supplements and wondering, 'Does glucosamine work?' you may finally have an answer. Since the large GAIT trial in 2008, we’ve suspected that glucosamine works for people with at least moderate pain due to knee osteoarthritis, especially when it’s … Read More

Pseudogout May Be Linked to Dehydration

Despite its name, pseudogout is real. It’s not gout, but there’s good reason it’s called “false gout.” Like gout, pseudogout is inflammatory arthritis caused by an excess of crystals in the joint fluid.  And, like gout, it hurts, leaving your joint swollen and red.  While gout is often triggered by … Read More

Joint Inflammation Is Easy to Recognize, But Difficult to Treat

Joint inflammation is easily recognizable—it's a condition that affects 80 percent of the world’s population. You’ll know inflammation by its symptoms: pain, warmth, redness, swelling, and perhaps loss of joint function. The symptoms are uncomfortable but manageable with rest, ice, compression, elevation—the classic "RICE" treatment—and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug like … Read More

Is There Such Thing as an Arthritis Diet?

Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reveal that approximately 52.5 million Americans suffer from some form of arthritis, including osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and gout. Arthritic diseases may be mild in some people but can be debilitating in others. Symptoms characterized by joint pain, swelling, and stiffness … Read More

Ankle Pain: 6 Common Causes

Our ankles are complex structures composed of four bones, the tibia and fibula (bones of the lower leg), the calcaneus (heel bone), and the talus (a small bone between the tibia, fibula and calcaneus), along with multiple tendons and ligaments. Cushioning between the bones in the ankle is provided by … Read More

Is There a Normal PSA Level?

There is no universally accepted "normal" PSA level. In the past, a PSA of 4 nanograms per milliliter of blood (ng/ml) or less was considered normal; however, more recent studies have shown that some men with PSAs below 4 have prostate cancer and some men with PSAs over 4 do … Read More

The Unusual Link Between Low Stomach Acid and Osteoporosis

Dr. Jonathan Wright, MD, a well-known natural healing physician in Renton, Washington reports that 90 percent of his patients with osteoporosis have low stomach acid. What's the link? If stomach acid is low, he explains, your body won't be able to absorb calcium, strontium, magnesium and the other minerals critical … Read More

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