About the Author

Leonaura Rhodes, MD

Leonaura Rhodes, MD

Dr. Leonaura Rhodes is a physician turned author and health writer and currently Medical Writer for Belvoir Media Group. Her primary role is creating content for Belvoir's Special Health Reports division and for Belvoir's consumer health website University Health News.

 

Prior to her work as a medical writer, Dr. Rhodes served as a physician in the UK and as a health coach. In 2014, she authored the book Beyond Soccer Mom: Strategies for a Fabulous Balanced Life.

In her medical career, Dr. Rhodes has worked in hospital medicine, general practice, developmental pediatrics, and public health. She gained her MD (MB ChB) from the University of Manchester and her Masters in Public Health from the University of London. She lives in Connecticut with her husband and two children.

Articles by Leonaura Rhodes, MD

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11. Caring for Yourself in Arthritis

Living with arthritis can be tough. It affects you physically and emotionally, and also can impact all of the practical aspects of your life. Moreover, when it comes to arthritis care, everyone is different: What works for one person may not work for you—so experiment, and come up with a

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10. Alternative Arthritis Treatments

Alternative treatment options—also known as complementary therapies—can be a good adjunct to medication when it comes to managing arthritis symptoms. Some of the options address physical causes of pain, but don’t forget that chronic pain is complicated. In arthritis, tissue inflammation, bone erosion, and nerve impingement can combine to “rewire”

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9. Arthritis and Diet

According to the World Health Organization, an unhealthy diet is one of the major risk factors for a range of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, and other conditions that are linked to obesity. While there is limited research on possible direct links between diet and arthritis, there is

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8. Arthritis and Exercise

The pain, stiffness, and restricted movement that accompany arthritis may seem like a good reason to curl up in bed,  but exercise is beneficial in mild-to-moderate arthritis. The benefits include:

Healing. Exercise increases blood circulation and oxygenation within joint tissue, promoting repair.
Lower risk of complications. Exercise helps protect against complications that

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7. Arthritis Surgery

Surgery may be considered as part of arthritis treatment when medication is no longer enough to manage your symptoms. The decision to head down the surgical route is a balancing act—you’ll need to consider your current symptoms and level of disability, and weigh them against the potential benefits, risks, and

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6. Medications for Arthritis

Acrucial weapon in the fight against arthritis is medication that, in some cases, slows disease progression as well as easing pain, maximizing joint function, and improving quality of life. There is no one-size-fits-all solution—trial and error may be required to find the drug (or drug combination) that works for you.

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5. Other Types of Arthritis

There are more than 100 types of arthritis. The two most common causes of chronic disabling arthritis are osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and each has its own chapter in this report. In this chapter, we look at other common types of arthritis: gout, pseudogout, psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis

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4. Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease involving joints and other organs in the body. It affects about 1.5 million Americans and 1 percent of the population worldwide, causing chronic pain, joint deformity, and significant disability.
What Happens in Rheumatoid Arthritis?
The disease process of RA is complex and not fully

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3. Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis and a leading cause of chronic pain and disability, affecting approximately 30 million people in the United States alone. It is a degenerative disease that begins with deterioration of the cartilage in synovial joints. Cartilage serves as a protective pad between