About the Author

Diane Muhlfeld

Diane Muhlfeld

Editor/writer Diane Muhlfeld joined Belvoir Media Group in 1996. Since 2002, she has focused on the company's growing health publishing division, which comprises 11 institution-affiliated newsletters and 24 annual Special Reports on various medical conditions and disorders, an exercise series, and numerous nutrition-oriented topics. Prior to her health publishing work, Muhlfed was involved in multiple Belvoir titles in other areas, including boating, aviation, antiques, and animal divisions. Muhlfeld first got into publishing after graduating from college, when she worked as an assistant editor at American Aviation Publications in Washington, DC, eventually covering the House and Senate for aviation legislation. After moving to the New York area, Muhlfeld spent six years as an editor for Yacht Racing Magazine, covering a variety of sailboat racing topics and personalities. She later worked for Greenwich Magazine in Greenwich, Conn., as a columnist and restaurant reviewer for the magazine’s "What’s New" monthly column and as a news-feature writer.

Articles by Diane Muhlfeld

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Protein + Resistance Training = Improved Muscle Strength and Mass

Protein supplements taken by adults who also lift weights (resistance, or strength, training) improve muscle strength and mass, according to a recent study from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, March 2018.
Led by Robert W. Morton, PhD student in the Exercise Metabolism Research Group,

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Physical Therapy Beats Opioids to Treat Pain After Hip Surgery

A Duke research team found that patients who received physical therapy treatment, rather than opioids, immediately following arthroscopic hip surgery had lower subsequent health-care costs and less opioid use.
Daniel Rhon, PT, DPT, DSc, Chad Cook, PT, PhD, and their colleagues at Duke compared downstream health care utilization—the need for further health-care

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Biological Clock May Be Cause of “Sundowning”

Researchers at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) may have discovered a cause of the early-evening agitation, aggression, and confusion that occur among dementia and Alzheimer’s disease patients, known as “sundowning.”
It is hoped the findings will provide the groundwork for future pharmacological interventions in Alzheimer’s and dementia patients to

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Newsbriefs: Nut Consumption; Anticoagulants; Migraine Treatment

Regular Nut Consumption May Lower Risk of Common Arrhythmia.
Nuts are chock full of heart-healthy nutrients, including unsaturated fatty acids, protein, fiber, minerals, vitamin E and folate. These compounds may be responsible for nuts’ newly discovered ability to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) and maybe heart failure, as well.

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Exercise Can Lower Inherited Heart Risk

For years, doctors have recommended exercise as a necessary component of a healthy lifestyle, designed to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke. A large study published online April 9, 2018, in Circulation confirmed that higher levels of fitness were associated with lower risk of these cardiovascular events, as

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Q&A: Chronic Stress; Pulmonary Embolism

Q. What are the signs of chronic stress, and what’s the best way to deal with it?
A. Stress uses up an enormous amount of energy, and people who are in a constant stress mode become susceptible to both physical and emotional disorders. When people experience stress, the body goes into

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Patients May Live Longer After Total Hip Replacement

Hip replacement surgery among older adults does more than relieve pain and improve range of motion, according to a large study in Sweden. It may also add to life expectancy.
The new findings were published online Feb. 28, 2018, in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research.
98 Percent Success Rate. More than 300,000