About the Author

Carrie Adkins-Ali

Carrie Adkins-Ali

Carrie Adkins-Ali is executive editor of the monthly publication Health News, produced by Belvoir Media Group with Duke Health. She's also a contributor to University Health News and former Daily Editor at Natural Health Advisory.

Adkins-Ali has specialized in health care issues and has written extensively on geriatric medicine, Alzheimer’s disease, sleep disorders, asthma, allergies, and non-traditional approaches to senior care. She also has a passion for the “silver bullet” of healthy lifestyle therapies —exercise and fitness. Carrie experienced amazing benefits such as improved energy, reduced inflammation (helping her asthma), and improved sleep to the point that she became hooked. She also gained certifications through the American Council on Exercise and the American Aerobic Association International.

Adkins-Ali now works in some of her spare time as a personal trainer and a group fitness instructor. When she discusses the benefits of regular resistance and aerobic exercise, she speaks directly from personal experience and passion.

Articles by Carrie Adkins-Ali

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Nutrition & Fitness Newsbriefs

Being Sedentary Is Like a Disease
It’s well established that exercise is important for good health, but a study published in JAMA Network Open in October reported that there is no upper limit for benefits. After administering a treadmill test to 122,007 people and later recording their mortality rates over a

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Intermittent Dieting

Weight loss is, in its simplest form, a mathematical equation. If you use more calories than you eat, you’ll lose weight. Biology, however, makes it a little more complicated. As you lose weight, your body wants to protect you from starvation by slowing down your metabolism to use calories more

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Mind & Memory Newsbriefs

Mirtazapine Does Not Boost SSRI Effectiveness
When patients have residual symptoms of depression after at least six weeks of treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-noradenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), many physicians add mirtazapine. A study published in November in the British Medical Journal found that this combination was

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Alzheimer’s Disease Goes Viral

While scientists are still puzzled by the ultimate cause of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), they are gathering pieces that they hope will soon yield a complete picture. The latest clue is the discovery that the brains of people with AD also contain high levels of human herpes virus (HHV) 6A and

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Internal Medicine Newsbriefs

Minimally Invasive Surgery Riskier for Early Cervical Cancer
A stunning new study published in October in the New England Journal of Medicine reports that minimally invasive surery (MIS) is associated with a higher risk of cervical cancer recurrence than traditional surgery. In the study, 300 women had MIS to remove the

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Insomnia? There’s an App for That

If you’ve ever been unable to fall asleep because your brain is too busy worrying about how desperately you need to fall asleep, or if you dread taking a sleeping aid because you don’t want to feel groggy in the morning, there’s hope outside of a pill bottle: digital cognitive

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Cardiovascular News Briefs

Emergency Medical Service Providers Affect Survival After Cardiac Arrest
A person’s odds of survival after a cardiac arrest can differ by more than 50 percent depending on which emergency medical service (EMS) agency provides initial care, according to a new study published in JAMA Cardiology. The researchers analyzed data from the

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2018 HN Index

Alcohol Consumption

In rheumatoid arthritis patients, Jan., 4
Guidelines revisited, June 5; July 4
Rates increasing, Feb., 2
Bones, Joints, and Pain
Back pain, spinal fusion, March, 8
Dental pain, NSAIDs versus opioids, Sept., 3
Fibromyalgia, Jan., 3
Hip replacement, longevity, June, 7
Knee pain, noninvasive treatment, Sept., 2
Marijuana,

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Cancer Clues in the Genome

Nearly 30 years ago, Mary-Claire King, PhD, made a discovery that would revolutionize the way the scientific community thought about inherited disease: She found a gene on chromosome 17 that was linked to countless cases of breast and ovarian cancer. The gene would later be named BRCA1, and it would