Tag: nutrition

Good nutrition is essential to maintaining health, especially as you get older. The food pyramid is a guide, created by the USDA, to help Americans choose the right combination of foods each day for optimum nutrition. It divides foods into groups?bread, cereal, rice, and pasta; fruit; vegetables; milk, yogurt, and cheese; meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nuts; fats, oils, and sweets?and describes how much of each food group people should eat. In recent years, MyPlate, also from the USDA, has replaced the food pyramid. MyPlate features a divided plate graphic representing the major food groups?fruits, vegetables, grains, protein, and dairy.

Certain food groups can help you lose weight. Eating high protein foods such as lean chicken breast, beans, fish, and tofu curb hunger, so you eat less. Protein is an important component of any diet, but it shouldn?t entirely replace other food groups, including whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

A low carb diet such as Atkins or South Beach is another approach to weight loss that focuses on protein and fats, and limits carbs from grains, starchy vegetables, fruit, and other sources. Yet this diet may not be a good long-term approach. While low carb diets do encourage weight loss in the short term, after a year or two they offer little advantage over traditional low-fat diets. And very restrictive low carb diets could potentially lead to nutritional deficiencies.

Watching your calorie intake is another way to control your weight. An online calorie counter can help you determine how many calories are in the foods you eat, and how many calories you consume each day. Pair up a calorie counter with a weight loss calculator, in which you input your weight, height, age, activity level, and the amount of weight you?d like to lose. The weight loss calculator will help you determine how many calories you should eat each day to reach your goal.

The Best Bread Alternatives for Sandwiches

Stores now offer a wide array of bread alternatives, including pita pockets, sandwich thins, flatbreads, and tortillas that are perfect for sandwiches.
Follow the same strategy when choosing bread alternatives as you do when selecting the healthiest loaves of bread: Review the Nutrition Facts labels and ingredient lists.
Check the Flour First
When

Newsbriefs: Lutein; Vegetarian and Vegan Diets; Afib Risk

Lutein May Help With Healthy Brain Aging
Consuming lutein—a pigment found in leafy greens, cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, and egg yolks—has been linked to the preservation of “crystallized intelligence,” which is the ability to use the skills and knowledge you acquire over a lifetime, according to a study published in

Pass the Parsnips

The folklore. A wallflower among root vegetables, the parsnip has a history of fluctuating in and out of vogue. Though early history confused parsnips and carrots as the same vegetable, parsnips are believed to be native to the East Mediterranean and have been cultivated for at least 2,000 years. Both

An Antioxidant Boom

You’ve likely heard of antioxidants, even if you’re not sure what they do. They’re frequently touted on food packages, such as nutrition bars and breakfast cereals, not to mention in promotions of the latest “superfoods” and a host of dietary supplements. The marketing of such products, however, is a bit

Eating to Fight Peptic Ulcers

People used to say stomach ulcers were caused by too much stress or spicy food, and the best thing to do when the pain flared up was to drink a nice big glass of milk. It turns out everything about that statement was wrong.

What They Are. Peptic ulcers are open

The Nuts and Bolts of Nutrition Bars

We know that eating a variety of whole foods from all food groups is the ideal way to eat. But we also know that sometimes life just gets in the way of our best laid plans. That’s when having a nutrition bar in your bag or glove compartment can save

Heart Disease Is a Woman’s Disease

In the U.S., 1 in 4 women will die from heart disease—almost half a million deaths each year—yet the perception that heart disease is primarily a man’s disease persists. An American Heart Association survey found that fewer than one-half of American women are aware that heart disease is their leading

From the Editor: Cooking for One

In this month’s issue of Focus on Healthy Aging, we’re looking at the Department of Agriculture’s latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The guidelines are updated every five years to reflect advancements in scientific understanding about healthy eating choices. They also are a useful outline for how much you should be

×
Enter Your Log In Credentials
×
×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps people live more sustainable, self-reliant lives, with feature stories on tending the garden, managing the homestead, raising healthy livestock and more!

×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps the small-scale poultry enthusiast raise healthy, happy, productive flocks for eggs, meat or fun - from the countryside to the urban homestead!