Tag: nutrition facts label

How to Read Nutrition Facts: Food Label Tips

How to Read Nutrition Facts: Food Label Tips

Reading nutrition facts labels isn’t that difficult, and indeed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is trying to make the information on those labels even clearer. Still, if you’re trying to make heart-healthy food purchases, it’s important to know what you’re looking for as you scan the backs of

Weight-Loss 101: Choose Low-Calorie Foods That Are Rich in Nutrients

Weight-Loss 101: Choose Low-Calorie Foods That Are Rich in Nutrients

If you’re aiming to reduce the number of calories you consume in order to lose weight, you’ll want to include plenty of low-calorie foods, ones that are high in nutritional value—in your diet plan. Fortunately, almost all non-starchy vegetables and fruits are low-calorie foods, so you have a large selection

Finding the Healthiest Frozen Yogurt

When frozen yogurt first appeared, it was widely considered to be a healthy alternative to ice cream. However, many frozen-yogurt products were high in saturated fat and sugar, and products that were heat-treated before freezing retained none of the healthy bacteria that convert milk into yogurt via the process of

Coming to Labels: Added Sugars

Last May, the FDA unveiled an updated Nutrition Facts label, which is required on packaged foods by July 2018 (small companies get an extra year). A big change to the label is listing the amount of “Added Sugars.” Those are sugars added by manufacturers. Although you should consider several aspects

8. Understanding Fats

Complex Chemistry
Making smart choices about fats and oils is not as simple as proponents of this product or that fad diet would have you believe. Common vegetable oils, as well as animal fats, such as butter, lard, and the fats in meat and dairy, contain a mix of different types

6. Smart Selections in the Dairy Aisle

Dairy Pros and Cons
Tufts’ MyPlate for Older Adults includes examples of dairy products such as low-fat milk and yogurt, because these are excellent sources of nutrients you may not be getting enough of as you age. These nutrients include calcium and (in fortified dairy products) vitamin D for healthy bones,

3. Eat a Variety of Vegetables

Plants and Phytonutrients
When you were growing up, your mother may have told you to “eat your vegetables”—and that’s still good advice when you are older. Vegetables occupy more space on Tufts’ MyPlate for Older Adults than any other food group for good reasons. In all of the various rating systems

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