Tag: nutrient dense foods

2. Easy Ways To Get The Nutrition You Need

Eat Better, Save Money
A common misconception about trying to eat food that is more nutritious is that improving your diet has to cost more. “Healthy food is not necessarily expensive,” says Parke Wilde, PhD, an associate professor at Tufts’ Friedman School who previously worked for the USDA’s Economic Research Service.

1. Eating Wisely As You Age

How Diet Makes a Difference
We all know that eating a healthy diet is important for growing children, and the obesity epidemic and soaring rates of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic diseases dramatically demonstrate the need to eat right from young adulthood into middle age. But does what you eat

8. Special Health Concerns

Live Better
Although some people use exercise to help reduce risk of disease, it also can be an important way to help you manage a chronic disease, including preserving your independence and ability to do other activities you enjoy. Although starting a new physical activity regimen may be intimidating at first,

Do You Really Need to “Detox?”

When the last strains of “Auld Lang Syne” have faded, the football bowl games have whistled to a close and the holiday decorations have been boxed away, New Year’s resolutions begin in earnest. Increasingly, the trendy way to begin the year on a healthy note involves ridding the body of

Secrets of Uncle Sam’s Nutrition Prescription

Every five years, your Uncle Sam rounds up the latest scientific evidence about nutrition and serves up advice about what to eat and drink for better health. The resulting Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA)—whose eighth edition was released in January—provides basic guidance to the American public about healthy eating patterns

Got Diabetes? What to Eat

One of the biggest challenges many people face when they find out they have diabetes is figuring out what they can eat and when. Fortunately, healthy eating when you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes (or prediabetes) isn’t substantially different from how we all should eat. Diabetes-friendly meals feature

10. Sugar, Salt and Snacks

Scale Back on Sugar
On average, added sugars (those not naturally found in foods) account for more than 13 percent of Americans’ daily calories—that’s almost 270 calories, or about 17 teaspoons of sugar, for someone consuming 2,000 calories a day. The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advise limiting added sugars to

3. Choosing Healthy Heart-Brain Foods

The Need for Nutrient Density
Another concept emphasized in the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) is nutrient density. You need to consume nutrient-dense foods and beverages to get enough of the nutrients you need without consuming too many calories. Aim to get as much nutritional “bang” for your caloric “bucks”

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