Tag: newsletter

Introduction

If you wonder whether your diet really makes a difference in your health as you get older, just ask Uncle Sam. Every five years, the federal government rounds up the latest scientific evidence about nutrition and serves up a few hundred pages of advice about what to eat and drink

Ask the Experts: Bell Pepper Colors; Protein in Nuts; Potatoes & Blood Sugar

Q: My local supermarket sells bell peppers in four different colors—green, red, yellow and orange. Do the different colors of peppers have different nutritional benefits?

A: Elizabeth J. Johnson, PhD, a scientist in Tufts’ HNRCA Antioxidants Research Laboratory, answers: “No matter the color of your pepper, the macronutrient (protein, fat, carbohydrate)

Q&A: Protein; Raw Fish; Fruit and Diabetes; Nut Butters

Q. I read in your newsletter that older people may need more protein than the recommended 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight to maintain muscle mass as they age. How much more, at age 75, might I need? Is 1.0 gram per kilogram of body weight too much?
A. Martha

Add These Lesser-Known Legumes to Your Healthy Pantry

New Year’s brings a brief boost in popularity for black-eyed peas, the key ingredient in the traditional Southern celebratory dish of Hoppin’ John. But if you’re looking for a nutritional bargain, black-eyed peas (aka cowpeas) should be a year-round staple in your pantry.
So should another lesser-known legume, garbanzo beans (aka

Ask the Experts: Diverticulitis; Eye Vitamins; Tea Shortage

Q: I’ve read in your newsletter about the benefits of nuts and “seeded” fruits such as blueberries, but I have diverticulitis. Do I need to avoid these healthy foods because of their effects on diverticulitis?

A: Katelyn Castro, a dietetic intern at Tufts’ Frances Stern Nutrition Center, and Joel Mason, MD,

“Foraging” in the Modern Supermarket

There’s good news at your local grocery store. “You should walk into a supermarket with a very positive attitude,” says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, director of Tufts’ HNRCA Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory and executive editor of the Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter. “The availability of healthy and affordable foods has greatly

More Good News for Egg Lovers

Eating eggs occasionally probably won’t raise your risk of heart attack, stroke or heart failure. That’s the latest good news for egg lovers from a Swedish study following two large groups of men and women for 13 years. Only men who averaged one egg a day or more saw any

Q&A: Grilling and Cancer Risk; Grains and Seeds; Counting Carbs

Q. Is it safest to avoid grilling foods because of increased risk of colon cancer?
A. Joel B. Mason, MD, Tufts professor of medicine and nutrition, answers, “Although the existing evidence falls short of being ‘proof positive,’ scientific studies continue to be published on a regular basis that suggest that regular

How Good Is Glycemic Index as a Marker of a Heart-Healthy Diet?

Does the glycemic index of the foods you eat matter? That’s the question raised by a headline-making new study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, the OmniCarb study, which calls into question the notion of “good carbs” versus “bad carbs.” Some previous research—along with popular diet plans—suggested that it’s

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