Tag: gluten free diet

Gluten is a protein found in grains like wheat, rye, and barley. People with celiac disease must stick to a gluten-free diet, avoiding all gluten-containing foods. Celiac disease is a condition in which the immune system attacks the small intestine and damages it when gluten is present. This damage can make it more difficult to absorb nutrients from food, potentially leading to malnutrition. Even a tiny amount of gluten can produce intestinal damage and symptoms like stomach upset, rash, fatigue, and joint pain. People with non-celiac gluten sensitivity?symptoms similar to those of celiac disease, but that don?t involve inflammation in the intestines?will need to limit or stay away from gluten-containing foods, too.

Eating a gluten-free diet doesn?t have to be impossibly strict or hard to follow. People can still eat a well-balanced menu of foods. Fruits, vegetables, fish, rice, and unprocessed meats can all be included in a gluten-free diet. Even some foods that traditionally include grains aren?t off-limits. Many breads, pasta, and cookies made with alternative grains like bean flour, amaranth, corn flour, and millet are available. A gluten-free diet can incorporate other types of grains, too, including arrowroot, beans, buckwheat, flax, millet, nut flours, potato, quinoa, rice, sorghum, soy, and tapioca.

To stick with a gluten-free diet, people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity need to stay alert for gluten in all its forms. Reading food labels and asking questions when ordering in restaurants can prevent symptoms, as well as further intestinal damage. Many packaged products are labeled ?gluten-free.? The FDA requires that these foods contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten.

It?s important for people with celiac disease to also be vigilant about foods that might not seem like obvious sources of gluten. These include salad dressings, medications, beer, communion wafers, soups, marinades, imitation bacon and seafood, processed lunch meats, soy sauce, and thickeners.

The Surprising Link Between Gluten and Depression

The Surprising Link Between Gluten and Depression

Is there a connection between gluten and depression? Investigators from the Department of Gastroenterology at Monash University and The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, had observed from previous studies that people with gluten sensitivity (but without celiac disease) may still have digestive symptoms while on a gluten-free diet but continue

What Has Gluten in It? 12 Surprising Food Sources

What Has Gluten in It? 12 Surprising Food Sources

A protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, gluten comes in many guises. It can be a filler, a binder, a thickener, and even a protein enhancer. So what has gluten in it? Some answers might catch you off guard. Did you know, for example, that soup, sushi, ice cream, and

Is Oatmeal Gluten-Free?

Is Oatmeal Gluten-Free?

If your doctor recently informed you that you’re intolerant of gluten, you might be wondering which of your favorite foods are now off limits—and how your diet will have to change in the long term. And if you’re a fan of hot cereal for breakfast, which is often made with

Newsbriefs: Whole Grains; Gluten-Free Diet; Postmenopausal Women

Eat Whole Grains for More Weight Loss
Whole grains may help with weight loss by decreasing calories retained during digestion, say researchers whose findings appeared Feb. 8, 2017 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the study, 81 people were provided with food that included either whole grains or refined

What Does Gluten-Free Mean?

What Does Gluten-Free Mean?

It’s a common question for anyone with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity: What does gluten-free mean? Unfortunately, in spite of the FDA’s gluten-free food labeling regulations becoming final in August 2014, there are still plenty of pitfalls that gluten-free consumers, especially those with gluten allergy symptoms, can fall into when

Is a Gluten-Free Diet Right for You

Gluten-free foods are flooding the market, which is great for people with celiac disease—but many people have equated “gluten-free” with “healthy,” and that’s not always the case. According to Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, a registered dietitian at UCLA Health System, gluten is a protein found primarily in whole-grain wheat,

Celiac Disease: How Do You Know If You Have It?

Celiac Disease: How Do You Know If You Have It?

When it comes to a suspected case of celiac disease or food allergy symptoms, everyone’s reaction is usually the same: “Okay, what am I in for? How much time will this take? Is there a gluten-free food list? And what will it cost?” Notions of how to care for loved

5. Make Half Your Grains Whole

Fiber for Your Heart
You can obtain much of the dietary fiber you need by eating grains. Tufts’ MyPlate for Older Adults provides examples of choices that are high in fiber, such as whole and fortified grains and 100% whole-wheat bread. Fiber from grains is known as “cereal fiber,” a term

Celiac Disease Diagnosis? 10 Steps You Can Take Right Now

Celiac Disease Diagnosis? 10 Steps You Can Take Right Now

If you’ve just been told that you or a family member has celiac disease, or even if you suspect a gluten intolerance, it’s likely your head is spinning with information overload.

Fortunately, it’s never been easier for those with a celiac disease diagnosis to embark on a special-diet lifestyle. Follow these

3. Fueling Activity

Nutrition Gives You an Edge
Healthy eating habits can help keep you energized and ready to be active. What, when, and how much you eat can greatly affect your ability to perform different physical activities, not to mention your ability to maintain good health. The composition of your meals and snacks,

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