Tag: diabetic neuropathy

High blood sugar from uncontrolled diabetes damages tissues and organs throughout the body. In diabetic neuropathy, high blood sugar damages the tiny blood vessels that supply nerves all over the body. Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes develop neuropathy. The longer someone has had diabetes, the greater their odds are of developing diabetic neuropathy.

The most common type of diabetic neuropathy, called peripheral neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, arms, and hands. People with peripheral neuropathy often complain of numbness, tingling, or pain in their limbs. The inability to feel pain in the feet increases the likelihood that cuts or sores will go untreated, which can lead to infection. If the infection remains untreated, ultimately tissue will die and the limb may need to be amputated.

Another form of diabetic neuropathy, called autonomic neuropathy, affects nerves of the autonomic nervous system, which control the digestive system, bladder, and sexual organs. Autonomic neuropathy can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, loss of bladder control, and erectile dysfunction. This type of diabetic neuropathy can also affect the nerves that control blood pressure, breathing, and vision.

Focal neuropathy affects nerves in the head and torso. It can lead to vision problems, such as double vision and trouble focusing. Focal neuropathy can also cause pain in the chest, stomach, side, chest, abdomen, front of the thigh, or outside of the shin. Some people develop paralysis on one side of the face, known as Bell?s palsy.

The best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy is with tight blood sugar control. Experts recommend that people with diabetes also have their feet checked regularly for signs of nerve damage. Once diabetic neuropathy is diagnosed, medications such as antidepressants and anticonvulsants can help manage nerve pain.

Take Prediabetes Seriously to Prevent Major Health Problems Later

Take Prediabetes Seriously to Prevent Major Health Problems Later

Don’t be misled by the “pre” in prediabetes—even though the condition is not yet full-blown diabetes, it’s likely to become so if you ignore it.

Prediabetes and diabetes occur because you have too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas, helps transport glucose from your

Most Common Health Problems in Elderly People

Most Common Health Problems in Elderly People

Certain conditions or disorders can develop as we age that impact our quality of life and ability to live independently. Here, we take a look at the most common health problems in elderly people—conditions always worth monitoring.

Osteoarthritis: Sometimes called “wear and tear” arthritis, osteoarthritis is characterized by a loss of

Diabetic Neuropathy: What It Means, How to Treat It

Diabetic Neuropathy: What It Means, How to Treat It

Diabetic neuropathy is a relatively common complication of diabetes. Some 60 to 70 percent of all people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy in their lifetime.
While the reason this happens isn’t fully understood, researchers think that blood glucose affects how nerves transmit signals in the body and also damages

Take Prediabetes Seriously to Prevent Major Health Problems Later

Don’t be misled by the “pre” in prediabetes—even though the condition is not yet full-blown diabetes, it’s likely to become so if you ignore it.
Prediabetes and diabetes occur because you have too much glucose (sugar) in your blood. Insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas, helps transport glucose from your

3. Managing Other Conditions

Whether we are aware of it or not, our skin is engaged in an around-the-clock fight against forces from within and without. Regardless of the direction from which they come, if these conditions, disorders, and diseases prevail, even on a temporary basis, the results can be painful and unsightly. Box

Diabetes Signs and Symptoms: What Are My Long-Term Risks?

Diabetes Signs and Symptoms: What Are My Long-Term Risks?

If you’ve experienced diabetes signs and symptoms, your healthcare provider may have told you about short-term risks of poorly controlled diabetes, among them them diabetic emergencies or diabetic shock.
These aren’t the only reasons, however, that you need to keep your diabetes signs and symptoms tightly controlled. (See also our

×
Enter Your Log In Credentials
×
×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps people live more sustainable, self-reliant lives, with feature stories on tending the garden, managing the homestead, raising healthy livestock and more!

×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps the small-scale poultry enthusiast raise healthy, happy, productive flocks for eggs, meat or fun - from the countryside to the urban homestead!