Tag: colorectal

Keep Cancer from Coming Back

After kicking cancer, you might worry it will return. That’s understandable. Cancer survivors are at significantly higher risk for cancer recurrence and for developing new cancers. But, that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do about it. Although many factors affect cancer risk and survival, following a healthy diet and

5. Make Half Your Grains Whole

Fiber for Your Heart
You can obtain much of the dietary fiber you need by eating grains. Tufts’ MyPlate for Older Adults provides examples of choices that are high in fiber, such as whole and fortified grains and 100% whole-wheat bread. Fiber from grains is known as “cereal fiber,” a term

4. Choose Richly Colored Fruits

Eat a “Rainbow” for Maximum Nutrition
Much of what we said in the previous chapter about vegetables also applies to fruits, including the importance of eating a “rainbow” to get a variety of beneficial phytonutrients. According to the USDA’s MyPlate, women over age 50 should get one and a half

3. Eat a Variety of Vegetables

Plants and Phytonutrients
When you were growing up, your mother may have told you to “eat your vegetables”—and that’s still good advice when you are older. Vegetables occupy more space on Tufts’ MyPlate for Older Adults than any other food group for good reasons. In all of the various rating systems

2. Easy Ways To Get The Nutrition You Need

Eat Better, Save Money
A common misconception about trying to eat food that is more nutritious is that improving your diet has to cost more. “Healthy food is not necessarily expensive,” says Parke Wilde, PhD, an associate professor at Tufts’ Friedman School who previously worked for the USDA’s Economic Research Service.

1. Eating Wisely As You Age

How Diet Makes a Difference
We all know that eating a healthy diet is important for growing children, and the obesity epidemic and soaring rates of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic diseases dramatically demonstrate the need to eat right from young adulthood into middle age. But does what you eat

Colorectal Cancers: Screening Saves Lives

Colorectal Cancers: Screening Saves Lives

Colorectal cancer remains one of the most curable cancers—if it’s detected early. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently renewed its advice stating that screening for colorectal cancers should begin at age 50 and continue to at least age 75.
For people age 76 to 85, the USPSTF noted

Newsbriefs: Red Meat; Magnesium; Nuts

Red Meat Consumption and Colorectal Cancer
Lifestyle factors like red meat consumption and smoking are associated with an increased risk of polyps, small growths in the colon that can develop into colorectal cancer. Further, a study that appeared Nov. 15, 2016 in the journal Gut revealed that eating red meat is

Newsbriefs: Hearing Loss; Cancer Deaths

Painkiller Use Associated With Hearing Loss
A recent study (American Journal of Epidemiology, Dec. 14, 2016) suggests there may be a link between hearing loss and long-term use of acetaminophen (Tylenol®) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen (Advil®, Aleve®). Researchers looked at data on 55,850 women age 44 to 69.

Whole Grains, Defined

Since 2000, whole-grain (WG) intake has been included among the recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In the 2005 and 2010 Guidelines the message states, “Eat at least 3 (one)-ounce-equivalents of whole grain daily, and at least half of all grains consumed should be whole grain.” Studies show that,

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