Tag: cognitive performance

4. Choose Richly Colored Fruits

Eat a “Rainbow” for Maximum Nutrition
Much of what we said in the previous chapter about vegetables also applies to fruits, including the importance of eating a “rainbow” to get a variety of beneficial phytonutrients. According to the USDA’s MyPlate, women over age 50 should get one and a half

Q&A: Vitamins; Blackberries; Fluoride

Q. Is vitamin K lost when a food is cooked or frozen?
A. Sarah L. Booth, PhD, director of Tufts’ HNRCA Vitamin K Laboratory, replies: “Fat-soluble vitamin K content is not affected by cooking or freezing. Water-soluble vitamins are the ones more likely to be lost in most cooking methods.”
Other fat-soluble

How to Use a Common Vitamin for Memory Protection

How to Use a Common Vitamin for Memory Protection

Vitamin D deficiency can cause a slew of problems. Side effects of a vitamin D deficiency can include impaired immune function, decreased bone density, and depression. And now researchers have discovered that vitamin D is an essential vitamin for memory, too.
Here, we look at three benefits of vitamin D.

vitamin for memory

Vitamin D deficiency can cause a slew of problems. Side effects of a vitamin D deficiency can include impaired immune function, decreased bone density, and depression. And now researchers have discovered that vitamin D is an essential vitamin for memory, too.

Here, we look at three benefits of vitamin D.

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1. Low Vitamin D is associated with poorer cognitive performance

Several studies have found vitamin D levels to be associated with cognitive function. In fact, low levels of vitamin D seem to raise the risk for cognitive impairment in both younger and older adults, and people with low vitamin D show worsened performance on a variety of cognitive tasks.[1-3] Having a vitamin D deficiency might also cause your cognitive function to decline at a faster rate.

2. Cognitive function declines at a faster rate in those who have lower vitamin D levels

Researchers from UC Davis and Rutgers University published a study in the journal JAMA Neurology in September 2015.[4] They looked at data from close to 400 men and women who had an average age of 75.

They found that vitamin D levels were significantly lower in people with dementia than they were in people who had either mild cognitive impairment or normal cognitive function.

But what was particularly interesting about the study was that the rate of decline in memory and other aspects of cognitive performance was faster in those people who had insufficient levels of vitamin D. In fact, over the five-year follow up, the rate of decline was two to three times faster in those we had low vitamin D compared to those who had sufficient levels.

Similar results were found in another study, where low levels of vitamin D were associated with greater decline in global cognitive function over time.[5]

3. Get adequate vitamin D to protect your brain

Step 1. First, visit your doctor to have your current level tested. Ask for the 25-hydroxy vitamin D test (also called the 25-OH vitamin D test or Calcidiol 25-hydroxycholecalciferol test) to see if you have a vitamin D deficiency.

Step 2. If your level is below 50 ng/mL, begin taking a supplement. Most people can start with a daily dose of 2000 IU, but some people need as much as 5000 IU or more.

Step 3. Work with your doctor, who can monitor your levels through bloodwork and keep you in the optimal range of 50 to 100 ng/mL.

Step 4. Getting safe sun exposure is another great way to boost your vitamin D levels. Aim for 15 to 30 minutes of sun time daily, but be sure to get out of the sun or wear sunscreen before burning. Discover more ways to get enough vitamin D here.

Don’t let low vitamin D levels stand in the way of good health. Plenty of vitamin D will help protect against memory loss, keep your bones healthy, boost your energy, and promote longevity.

So get started in boosting your levels today.

Share your experience

Do you take this vitamin for memory? How much do you find you need to maintain adequate levels? Share your experience in the comments section below.


[1] Eur J Neurol. 2015 Jan;22(1):106-15, e6-7.

[2] Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2015 Aug 25;11:2217-23.

[3] J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;45(4):1119-26.

[4] JAMA Neurol. 2015 Sep 14. [Epub ahead of print]

[5] J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Apr;62(4):636-41.


Originally published in 2015 and updated.

1. Low

6. Can Supplements Really “Boost” Brainpower

One of the fastest-growing segments of the dietary supplement industry is the market for products claiming to protect your memory or “boost” your brainpower. These range from mega-doses of vitamins your body does actually need (though not necessarily in such quantity) to novel concoctions such as Asian herbal remedies or

5. Nutrients in Supplement Form

Multivitamins and Your Brain
For many Americans, taking a multivitamin as “insurance” against nutritional shortfalls is a daily habit. Americans have been taking multivitamin/mineral supplements since the early 1940s, and an estimated one-third of all U.S. consumers take these regularly. Multivitamins account for almost one-sixth of all purchases of dietary supplements

4. Brain Power Foods

Fruit and Vegetable Smarts
When your mom told you to eat your fruits and vegetables, she may not have known that those foods are good for your brain—but it was good advice in any case. We’ve seen how an overall healthy dietary pattern can help protect against dementia and cognitive decline.

3. Fats, Carbohydrates, and Protein

Basic Nutrients
Before you worry about getting enough of specific vitamins or minerals, it’s smart to consider the dietary roles of the three most basic forms of nutrients: fats, carbohydrates, and protein. These are so fundamental to the nutritional quality of the foods we eat that their relative proportions are actually

2. Brain-Healthy Dietary Patterns

When the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) were released in January 2016, they earned headlines for their focus on added sugars and relaxed view of dietary fat. But the most important point of the updated DGAs was often overlooked in the flurry of media coverage: Healthy eating is more

How to Increase Memory Power: 4 Proven Methods

How to Increase Memory Power: 4 Proven Methods

It happens—that so-called “senior moment” where you forget a word, completely miss an appointment, or can’t recognize the face of someone who so clearly knows you. But don’t worry; you can do something about those memory lapses. A number of simple routines you can adopt may increase memory power—and provide

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