Tag: a healthy snack

Eating for Energy: Foods That Fuel

Eating for Energy: Foods That Fuel

We encounter a never-ending stream of products that claim to be energy foods. Energy drinks, energy bars, candy, and processed snacks fill grocery and convenience store shelves everywhere, always promising to provide a delicious jolt of energy.
The problem with many of these products is that the boost of energy

Ask the Experts: Popcorn; Antioxidant Loss; Spicy Pepper Alternatives

Q: I’ve been reading in your newsletter about the downsides of consuming too many starchy foods. Since corn is a starchy food, does that apply to popcorn, which I’ve been eating thinking it’s a healthy snack?

A: Nicola M. McKeown, PhD, director of the Friedman School’s Nutritional Epidemiology Program and a

Finding High-Protein Foods from Plant Sources

Finding High-Protein Foods from Plant Sources

Some plant foods contain fiber, vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and healthy fats, along with a significant amount of protein. Studies suggest that adopting a plant-based diet lowers your risk of chronic disease and extends your life. Many health experts recommend including a few meatless meals that contain high-protein foods from plant

Savor the Holidays

Statistics show that the average person gains about five pounds during the holiday season. While that might not seem like that much, the problem is most people don’t lose the weight. And year after year, those pounds add up.

Culprits include richer foods, high-calorie beverages, more parties, and snacks at every

Shopper’s Guide: Pop, Pop, Pop

Popcorn can be an incredibly healthy snack, but unfortunately it’s often disparaged. When popcorn is in the news, it’s usually the buttery, salty stuff you find at the movie theaters. A medium-sized container (that’s 20 cups, by the way) at the theater contains a whopping 1,200 calories, 60 grams (g)

Meet Sorghum

The folklore. Sorghum is an ancient grain with an 8,000 year-old history, and it’s the fifth-most-important cereal crop in the world. And it’s probably not in your pantry—yet. Unlike other countries—including Africa and parts of Asia, where sorghum is grown for human consumption—the U.S. grows it mainly for livestock feed

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