Identifying Signs of Dementia

Are frequent memory problems that interfere with everyday life and changes in personality signs of dementia? They at least warrant an evaluation.

signs of dementia

If you or a loved one experience what you feel may be signs of dementia or Alzheimer's disease, an evaluation is the next step. While dementia and AD aren't curable, there are treatments that can delay onset, as our post describes.

© Sangoiri | Dreamstime.com

As you get older, it’s natural to be concerned about the possibility that you or a loved one will begin showing signs of dementia. In fact, among adults who are age 65 or older, one in nine will develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD), according to the Alzheimer’s Association. How can you tell the difference between the cognitive changes that commonly occur with advancing age and those that may signal the onset of AD?

“It’s important to keep in mind that some degree of forgetting is normal as you get older,” says Lisa Ravdin, PhD, director of the Weill Cornell Neuropsychology Service in the Department of Neurology.

Keep Your Mind Sharp!

Download this expert FREE guide, Dementia Symptoms, Stages, and Treatment: Vascular dementia, Lewy body dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and how to improve memory.

Recognize dementia symptoms and signs to help detect and treat memory disorders.

Age-Related Cognitive Changes

Normal changes in memory associated with aging are characterized by brief memory lapses, such as forgetting names, misplacing objects (such as car keys and eyeglasses), and having more difficulty remembering telephone numbers, addresses, and zip codes.

One of the most important things to assess is whether or not your forgetfulness is interfering with your ability to engage in normal, daily activities and responsibilities. It is common to feel frustration, annoyance, or even worry when you have memory lapses, but that is a normal reaction.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

TELLTALE MEMORY DISORDER SYMPTOMS

Examples of symptoms that suggest the presence of a memory disorder include:

  • The inability to remember how to play a favorite game.
  • Having trouble following a recipe you’ve made many times before.
  • Missing payments on bills that have been due at the same time each month or each year for several months or years previously.
  • Frequently forgetting important dates, such as a spouse’s birthday or your wedding anniversary.
  • Getting lost when driving to familiar places or being unsure of how to get back home.
  • Asking the same question or telling the same story repeatedly.

Symptoms of Dementia

Memory problems associated with AD and other types of dementia happen with increasing frequency and are more noticeable to others. People with AD often ask the same questions and share the same information repeatedly, and they may struggle with activities that they once found easy, such as following driving instructions or maps, remembering to take medications, and paying bills on time.

They may also exhibit mood or personality changes, such as becoming irritable, angry, suspicious, or secretive. Other warning signs of a memory disorder include:

  • Confusion about time or place
  • Having trouble creating plans or solving problems
  • New problems with words in speaking or writing
  • Being unable to retrace steps if something has been misplaced
  • Poor judgment
  • Withdrawal from work or social activities

Why Evaluation Is Important

Since there is no cure for AD, you may think that there’s not much to gain from an evaluation of your cognitive function. However, an evaluation can be beneficial for several reasons.

“There are many possible reasons for having memory problems,” says Dr. Ravdin. “A proper evaluation can help identify the cause of memory issues, which may be something that is treatable.” Vitamin deficiencies, medication side effects, thyroid disease, poor sleep, chronic pain, depression, and stress are some common factors that can affect your memory.

“Your brain performs many functions, and all areas need to be tested to get an accurate picture of what is going on,” explains Dr. Ravdin. “Ideally, tests should be administered by a neuropsychologist who specializes in memory disorders.”

An evaluation is used to assess a person’s memory, as well as other aspects of cognition, such as language, attention, auditory and visual processing, motor control, and executive functions, including reasoning, decision-making, impulse control, planning and execution, and organization.

“In many cases, people who have AD are unaware of how often they forget things. If family members or close friends tell you that they are concerned about your memory, see your doctor, even if you don’t think you have a problem. Your loved ones may notice changes in your everyday functioning that are not as obvious to you,” says Dr. Ravdin.

Signs of Dementia: After Diagnosis

If you’ve been diagnosed with AD, you may be prescribed medication that could slow the progress of symptoms and improve your quality of life. You can learn coping strategies that will help you continue living safely and independently in a community setting. You can also plan ahead for your own care and make decisions about financial and legal matters; making decisions about your future may help ease your concerns.

“When the diagnosis is AD, typically, it doesn’t come as a surprise, especially to the family members. A diagnosis validates their concerns and gives them direction. It’s better to know and get it addressed; often, the diagnosis is a relief, compared to wondering and feeling anxious but not really knowing,” says Dr. Ravdin.

For related reading, see these University Health News posts:

Anchor
Comments
  • Very interesting synopsis. I have been examined and will be put through a battery of test in 6 months.

Leave a Reply

×
Enter Your Log In Credentials
×
×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps people live more sustainable, self-reliant lives, with feature stories on tending the garden, managing the homestead, raising healthy livestock and more!

×

Please Log In

You are trying to access subscribers-only content. If you are a subscriber, use the form below to log in.

Subscribers will have unlimited access to the magazine that helps the small-scale poultry enthusiast raise healthy, happy, productive flocks for eggs, meat or fun - from the countryside to the urban homestead!

Send this to friend

Hi,
I thought you might be interested in this article on http://universityhealthnews.com: Identifying Signs of Dementia

-- Read the story at http://universityhealthnews.com/daily/memory/identifying-signs-dementia-2/