Bone Density Chart: Understand Your Bone Density Scores

Even if you're otherwise healthy, getting a baseline bone density test can predict even the slightest beginnings of bone loss in your future.

There are a variety of bone density tests available, but the "gold standard" test for diagnosing osteoporosis is the DEXA scan.

There are a variety of bone density tests available, but the "gold standard" test for diagnosing osteoporosis is the DEXA scan.

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Osteoporosis is an insidious illness that sneaks up on you. Studies suggest that about 50 percent of women over the age of 50 will suffer a fracture related to bone loss. And each year, approximately 80,000 men have a hip fracture. That’s why it’s so critical to undergo bone density testing. Even if you’re otherwise healthy, getting a baseline bone density test can predict even the slightest beginnings of bone loss in your future.

There are a variety of bone density tests available, but the “gold standard” test for diagnosing osteoporosis is the DEXA scan, also written as “DXA scan” (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), which measures bone density in the spine, hip, or wrist.

If you do have low bone density, these are the most common locations for fractures.

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Does the DEXA Scan Hurt?

A DEXA scan is painless and only takes about 15 minutes to perform. During the test, you lie on your back on a table and a scanner passes over your body taking radiographic images.

Who Should Get a DEXA Scan?

DEXA screening is recommended for all men over the age of 70 and all women over the age of 65. Bone density should also be measured in women between the ages of 50 and 65 who are considered high risk for osteoporosis. In addition to obtaining an initial DEXA scan, repeating the scan every two to five years is recommended, depending on your risk factors.

What About Radiation Exposure?

The radiation emitted from a DEXA scan is about one-tenth the radiation emitted from a chest x-ray. Still, there are other bone density tests which emit less or no radiation at all: QCT scan, NTx urine test, or vitamin D test.

Interpreting Your Bone Density Scores

DEXA bone density scores are measured as “T-scores,” which is a comparison of a person’s bone density with that of a healthy 30-year-old of the same sex. The lower bone density scores, the lower your total bone density, indicating osteopenia or osteoporosis.

T-Score Bone Density Chart:

Bone Density Chart: Understand Your Bone Density Scores A T-score of -1.0 to -2.5 signifies osteopenia, meaning below-normal bone density without full-blown osteoporosis. This stage of bone loss is the precursor to osteoporosis.

Using a Bone Density Chart to Estimate Total Bone Loss

To better understand the current health of your bones, you should multiply your T-score by 10 percent (as shown in the bone density chart below). This will give you a rough estimate of how much bone density has already been lost.

Bone Density Chart for Estimated Amount of Bone Loss

Bone Density Chart for Estimated Amount of Bone Loss

Keep in Mind…

Focusing too closely on the DEXA bone density scores can be a mistake. Many doctors admit that the DEXA T-score is not a perfect predictor for bone health or fracture risk. That’s why it’s important to consider taking the other tests. Furthermore, your risk factors are just as important as your T-score and may lead to better predictions of bone disease. In order to determine your true osteoporosis risk factors, use our self-test here:

Should I Be Worried About Bone Loss? Use Our Quiz to Find Out!

Now that you understand your bone density scores, here’s what to do about it. If your DEXA bone density scores show that you’re in danger for developing osteoporosis or if you have discovered by using our self-test that you indeed have several risk factors, this should not be ignored. You need to take steps right now to fight this disease. Don’t forget that full-blown osteoporosis is a serious condition that can have devastating consequences on your health and quality of life. Getting low bone density scores is only an initial warning. Are you going to sit there and do nothing or will you begin to prepare for the oncoming attack?


Originally published in 2013.

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