About the Author

Matthew Solan

Matthew Solan

Matthew Solan is a health and fitness writer and editor based in St. Petersburg, Fla. Currently, he serves as Executive Editor of Harvard Men's Health Watch, published by Harvard Health Publications. His articles on medicine, exercise science, and nutrition have appeared in leading publications and websites, among them Men's Health, Men's Fitness, Muscle & Fitness, Runner's World, Muscle Magazine, Natural Health, and Yoga Journal. He also has co-authored several books with top physicians and nutritionists. Solan previously served as executive editor for UCLA Health's Healthy Years and has been a contributor to Duke Medicine's Health News and Weill Cornell Medical College's Women Nutrition Connection and Women's Health Advisor newsletters. He earned a master of fine arts (MFA) in writing from the University of San Francisco and a bachelor of science in journalism from the University of Florida where he is a frequent guest lecturer. Solan is also an assistant coach for Tampa Bay Fit, a marathon and half marathon training program, and rides most weekends with the St. Petersburg Bicycle Club. You can follow him on Twitter @matthewsolan, or visit his website www.matthewsolan.com.

Articles by Matthew Solan

Tinnitus: Treatment and Prevention

Daily

Tinnitus: Treatment and Prevention

An estimated 50 million Americans suffer from tinnitus, which causes a person to perceive noise in one or both ears when no external sound exists. The noise can occur intermittently or persistently and can interfere with sleep and concentration, and has been linked with stress and depression. The condition is

Dealing with Dysphagia: A Difficult-to-Swallow Condition

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Dealing with Dysphagia: A Difficult-to-Swallow Condition

Dysphagia is a condition that can occur at any age, although it’s more common in older adults. It falls into one of the following categories:

Esophageal dysphagia: This is the feeling that food gets stuck in your throat or in your chest.
Oropharyngeal dysphagia: This occurs when certain conditions weaken your

How to Stop Cramps

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How to Stop Cramps

Just about everybody at some point wants to know how to stop cramps. The condition is often the result of a digestive issue, like indigestion or an upset stomach. Women may experience cramping during menstruation while others may feel cramping during or after exercise.

On the other hand, cramping and pain

How to Remove Ear Wax

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How to Remove Ear Wax

Your ear wax may not appear like a vital bodily function, but it plays an important role in your ear health. Ear wax (also spelled as one word: earwax) is a yellowish, waxy substance called cerumen, and it is produced by glands in the ear canal. Its job is to

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To Drink or Not to Drink

You’re dining with good friends at a nice French restaurant, and the waiter proffers a wine list. Must you decline and cheerfully order ginger ale?

Not necessarily, says Alison A. Moore, MD, MPH, Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Division of Geriatrics. Alcohol offers a

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Home-Based Walking Program Helps PAD Patients

If you suffer from peripheral artery disease (PAD), new research suggests you take a walk. The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association (May 21, 2014), found that a home-based walking program could help PAD patients walk faster and farther.

PAD is a disease in which plaque builds

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Tai Chi: It May Be Good for What Ails You

The practice of tai chi originated in China thousands of years ago as a series of slow, gentle, contemplative bodily exercises geared largely toward improving one’s emotional self-control and the demanding physical skills required by practitioners of the martial arts. Today, an abundance of scientific research supports the widely held

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Should You Try to Raise Your HDL?

For many years, the formula for better heart health has included measures to reduce the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol while at the same time increasing the levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in their circulating blood.

And while a high level of LDL—the so-called “bad” cholesterol—continues to be recognized