About the Author

Kate Brophy

Kate Brophy

Kate Brophy is Executive Editor of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai's Focus on Healthy Aging newsletter. She has been a regular contributor to Weill Cornell Medical College's Women's Nutrition Connection and Women's Health Advisor, Duke Medicine's Health News, UCLA's Healthy Years, and the Cleveland Clinic's Heart Advisor, and has edited health Special Reports for the Cleveland Clinic, the Center for Sleep Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, and Duke Medicine's Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine. Before specializing in health, Kate was editor of one of the UK's market-leading parenting magazines, and she has also contributed to Parents, Parenting, Scholastic Parent and Child, DailyParent.com, and Gurgle.com, as well as being launch editor for Supernanny.com.

Articles by Kate Brophy

Ice or Heat? For Back Pain, It Depends

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Ice or Heat? For Back Pain, It Depends

Using ice or heat for back pain is a simple, drug-free treatment approach that can be very effective. Which one suits you best will depend on your individual back pain and, specifically, whether your aches and pains are chronic or acute.
Chronic pain may result from slow-developing conditions that cause

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Consider Volunteering: Your Brain May Benefit!

Numerous studies suggest that staying social may benefit your emotional wellbeing and neurological health as you age. Finding a sense of purpose also is important—one 2015 study found that older adults who reported having a sense of purpose and direction in life tend to live longer than their peers. Volunteering

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Heartburn May Signal Reflux Disease

Up to 15 million Americans are thought to suffer from heartburn (a form of indigestion that is felt as a burning sensation in the chest) each day—but it isn’t normal to have heartburn after every meal, according to Mount Sinai gastroenterologist Brijen Shah, MD. “If you do, it’s possible that

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Get Better Posture With The Alexander Technique

If you have arthritis or other conditions that cause muscle tightness, you may find relief from the “Alexander Technique,” an exercise method that helps improve movement, balance, support, and coordination—which, in turn, relieves muscle tightness and related discomfort.
The Alexander Technique can be particularly beneficial if you suffer from neck pain,

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Newsbriefs: Lung Cancer; Knee Arthritis

Few Who Need Lung Cancer Screening Get It
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) began recommending in December 2013 that people at high risk for lung cancer have yearly screening with low-dose CT scans. However, few people who could benefit from lung cancer screening—mostly current and former smokers—are getting it,

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Newsbriefs: AFib; Hip Fractures

AFib Survival is Improving
Patients with the abnormal heart rhythm atrial fibrillation (AFib) are hospitalized more frequently than in the past, but their survival rates are improving, say researchers writing in Circulation, Feb 1. The study analyzed data on Medicare patients age 65 and older, evaluating their hospitalization rates, length of

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Ovarian Cancer Remains Difficult to Diagnose

More than 21,000 women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer in the U.S. each year, and more than 14,000 die from it. The current five-year survival rate for the disease is less than 46 percent, though this is an improvement on the 36 percent of women who survived for five years

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Stay Vigilant for Worsening Heart Failure

More than five million Americans have heart failure, and 500,000 more cases are diagnosed each year. The condition develops gradually, due to injury to or weakness of the heart—underlying causes include heart attack, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, heart valve disease, abnormal heart rhythms, diseases of the heart muscle

COPD Symptoms: What They Mean

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COPD Symptoms: What They Mean

Knowing the facts about lungs will help you understand why COPD—chronic obstructive pulmonary disease—can be difficult to diagnose until it is quite advanced. The lungs, with more than 300 million alveoli, have an amazing capacity. Not all of these alveoli are used for the day-to-day work of normal breathing—the extra

Periodic Limb Movement Disorder: What Does It Mean?

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Periodic Limb Movement Disorder: What Does It Mean?

If you have periodic limb movement disorder, your legs and arms may move around from a few times to close to 1,000 times while you’re asleep. These movement episodes can be as brief as a fraction of a second or last as long as five seconds. And they frequently recur