About the Author

Kate Brophy

Kate Brophy

Kate Brophy is Executive Editor of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai's Focus on Healthy Aging newsletter. She has been a regular contributor to Weill Cornell Medical College's Women's Nutrition Connection and Women's Health Advisor, Duke Medicine's Health News, UCLA's Healthy Years, and the Cleveland Clinic's Heart Advisor, and has edited health Special Reports for the Cleveland Clinic, the Center for Sleep Medicine at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, and Duke Medicine's Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine. Before specializing in health, Kate was editor of one of the UK's market-leading parenting magazines, and she has also contributed to Parents, Parenting, Scholastic Parent and Child, DailyParent.com, and Gurgle.com, as well as being launch editor for Supernanny.com.

Articles by Kate Brophy

Causes of Depression: 7 Major Factors

Daily

Causes of Depression: 7 Major Factors

If you become ill, usually you can pinpoint a reason. A stiff, swollen joint, for example, might be due to injury or to a chronic disease like arthritis, while an upset stomach might be due to food poisoning. The causes of depression are harder to pin down. And unfortunately, they

What’s Causing Your Upper Back Pain?

Daily

What’s Causing Your Upper Back Pain?

As a rule, upper back pain is unusual, since the upper back is structurally stronger than the lower back and also isn’t as mobile, due to being connected to the rib cage. This lack of motion affords it some protection against the bending-twisting types of injury you might sustain in

Topics

Heavy Drinkers Risk Liver Disease

According to a recent study (Hepatology, Oct. 3, 2016), the number of hospitalizations for cirrhosis of the liver nearly doubled from 371,000 in 2001 to 659,000 in 2011. Cirrhosis causes healthy tissue to be gradually replaced by scar tissue that impedes blood flow through the liver, impacting liver function and

Topics

Creams and Lotions to Nourish Older Skin

One of the most obvious signs you’re getting older is changes in your skin: fine lines, wrinkles, and loss of volume that develop due to a decrease in the production of two important structural proteins (collagen and elastin), diminished hyaluronic acid (a skin compound that holds in moisture), and changes

Topics

Avoid Injury When You Exercise

About 27 percent of adults age 65 and older don’t exercise, according to a recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The study (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Sept. 15, 2016) revealed that the numbers are even worse for people age 75 and older: thirty-five percent

Topics

Newsbriefs: Dementia Risk; Arthritis

Living Close to Busy Roads May Raise Dementia Risk
People who live close to busy roads have a greater risk for developing dementia than those who live further away, new research (The Lancet, Jan. 4) suggests. The study examined health records for more than 6.5 million people aged 20 to 85.

Topics

From the Editor: Cooking for One

In this month’s issue of Focus on Healthy Aging, we’re looking at the Department of Agriculture’s latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The guidelines are updated every five years to reflect advancements in scientific understanding about healthy eating choices. They also are a useful outline for how much you should be

Topics

Newsbriefs: Hearing Loss; Cancer Deaths

Painkiller Use Associated With Hearing Loss
A recent study (American Journal of Epidemiology, Dec. 14, 2016) suggests there may be a link between hearing loss and long-term use of acetaminophen (Tylenol®) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like ibuprofen (Advil®, Aleve®). Researchers looked at data on 55,850 women age 44 to 69.

Topics

Hemorrhagic Stroke: Why It Happens, How It’s Treated

While ischemic stroke (the type that is caused by a blood clot blocking blood flow in the brain) accounts for nearly 90 percent of strokes, hemorrhagic stroke, which occurs due to bleeding in the brain, is even more deadly. “It is less treatable than ischemic stroke,” confirms neurologist Stanley Tuhrim,