About the Author

Dawn Bialy

Dawn Bialy

Dawn Bialy is Executive Editor of the Weill Cornell Medical College Women’s Health Advisor and Executive Editor of Weill Cornell Women’s Nutrition Connection. She also has contributed to health publications associated with the Cleveland Clinic, UCLA, and Mount Sinai. Bialy also has served as Managing Editor for special health reports on nutrition and diet from The Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
Bialy strives to provide readers with science-based, practical actions they can take to improve their health. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from New College of Florida and is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists. Her pet peeve is misleading claims made by food and supplement manufacturers.

Articles by Dawn Bialy

Topics

Gender Differences in Sleep Health Need More Study

Sleep research must examine sex and gender differences, with more study of sleep-related problems that affect women as well as potential treatments, according to a report by the Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR) published in the July 2014 issue of the Journal for Women’s Health. SWHR researchers found that there

Turn Nutritious Fruits Into Healthy Desserts

Daily

Turn Nutritious Fruits Into Healthy Desserts

Fruits provide slow-digesting carbs, various types of fiber, and a host of vitamins, including A, C, E, and K plus several B vitamins. Fruits also provide many important minerals, including calcium, potassium, manganese, magnesium, and copper, along with a cornucopia of phytochemicals. Among plant foods, fruits are especially high in

Daily

New Tests for Early Detection of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) strikes more than five million Americans, two-thirds of whom are women. One of the major challenges of the disease is early detection. Right now, most diagnoses occur late in its development, when significant brain damage has already occurred.

“There is a pressing need for easier, less invasive diagnostic

Topics

Knee Pain: When Joint Replacement is the Best Option

Knee replacement surgery has become increasingly more common over the last 15 years, mainly because the obesity epidemic has increased the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in the knee. More than 600,000 total knee replacements (TKRs) are performed each year in the U.S., according to figures from the Agency for Healthcare

Topics

Coronary Microvascular Disease: A Woman’s Issue

Heart disease remains the number one killer of women and men in the U.S., but there are important differences in the types of coronary problems that affect each gender. Women are more likely than men to have heart disease in the network of small arteries of the heart, which is

Topics

How Precision Medicine and Genetic Profiling Will Impact Your Health

The term “personalized medicine”—the use of genetic profiles to help make medical decisions—has evolved into “precision medicine,” and the implications will change the way conditions and diseases are diagnosed, treated, and perhaps prevented.

Ronald Crystal, MD, Chairman of the Department of Genetic Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, explains, “Precision medicine

Topics

Breast Cancer: Separating Fact From Fiction

Breast cancer is not caused by cell phones, caffeine, antiperspirants, bras, or mammograms. It’s not contagious, it does not automatically develop if you have a family history of the disease, and a diagnosis is not a death sentence.

Those myths about breast cancer are easy to dispel because there is simply

Topics

Women Get Sleep Apnea Too: Be Alert for Symptoms

Decades ago, heart disease was thought of as a “man’s disease.” Similarly, one of the most common sleep disorders, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), has received a masculine label.

OSA affects half as many women as men, but it is far from rare—about six percent of women suffer from this condition.

OSA is