About the Author

Dawn Bialy

Dawn Bialy

Dawn Bialy is Executive Editor of the Weill Cornell Medical College Women’s Health Advisor and Executive Editor of Weill Cornell Women’s Nutrition Connection. She also has contributed to health publications associated with the Cleveland Clinic, UCLA, and Mount Sinai. Bialy also has served as Managing Editor for special health reports on nutrition and diet from The Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University.
Bialy strives to provide readers with science-based, practical actions they can take to improve their health. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from New College of Florida and is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists. Her pet peeve is misleading claims made by food and supplement manufacturers.

Articles by Dawn Bialy

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Q&A: Calorie Counting; Vitamin B12

Q. I need advice on how to lose weight the smart, healthy way. Do you think that tallying a daily calorie count would be a good start?
A. So many people want to know how to lose weight, but too many of them aren’t willing to do it the right way.

Daily

Combat Night Cramps and Blood Clots With Exercise

Night cramps are common in seniors: You may be familiar with the often intense pain that accompanies the sudden, involuntary spasm in your calf muscles. Robert Turner, PT, OCS, a board-certified orthopedic specialist and clinical supervisor at the Spine Therapy Center at the Weill Cornell-affiliated Hospital for Special Surgery, points

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Condiments Add Flavor—But Watch the Salt

Adding condiments to a meal may seem like an afterthought, but those little squirts and spoonfuls of flavor can add a lot of taste. Condiments can turn a boring sandwich, burger, or soup into a culinary delight. Nutritionally speaking, however, most don’t bring much to a meal, except for a

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Diet and Lifestyle Changes Can Alleviate GERD Symptoms

It’s easy to reach for antacids or prescription medications when the fiery pain of heartburn strikes. But you may find more relief by changing your diet and lifestyle instead. Heartburn is just one symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition that is often related to the foods you eat

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Newsbriefs: Prediabetes Risk; Bladder Cancer; Weight Cycling

Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Raise Prediabetes Risk
Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages significantly raises your risk for prediabetes (a condition that can lead to full-blown diabetes), according to a recent 14-year study (Journal of Nutrition, Nov. 9, 2016). Study participants who drank the highest amounts of sugar-sweetened beverages (an average of six 12-fluid-ounce

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Cut Cardiovascular Risks With Your Diet

You already know that having high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and/or blood pressure raises your odds of having cardiovascular disease (CVD), which increases your risk of heart attack, stroke, and other problems that affect your heart and circulatory system—but you may not know just how much your odds drop when you

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The Pros and Cons of Probiotics

Probiotics are live micro­organisms—bacteria and yeasts—that are commonly referred to as “good” bacteria. They are believed to benefit digestive health by increasing the population of good bacteria in the intestines, which prevents “bad” bacteria (for example, Clostridium difficile and Escherichia coli) from causing illness.
Yogurt and kefir (a drink made from

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Newsbriefs: Probiotics; Stroke Risk; Sodium

Probiotics Linked to Brain Health
A recent study (Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Nov. 10, 2016) suggests that probiotics may improve thinking and memory in people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Probiotics (see right) are live bacteria that are present in some yogurts, and also available in supplement form. They are typically recommended

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Vitamin E Supports Heart, Brain, Eye, and Immune Health

You may not hear much about vitamin E, but it more than pulls its weight when it comes to your health. It’s an antioxidant that helps to protect cells from the damaging effects of free radicals (unstable molecules that occur naturally in the body). It boosts immunity, reduces the risk

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Women Fare Worse Than Men Following a Heart Attack

Middle-aged women are in worse shape both before and after having a heart attack than men, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions in June 2014.

The researchers analyzed data from 3,501 patients aged 55 and under (median age 48) who